Parental experiences and preferences which influence subsequent use of post-discharge health services for children born very preterm

Pritchard, Margo A., Colditz, Paul B. and Beller, Elaine M. (2008) Parental experiences and preferences which influence subsequent use of post-discharge health services for children born very preterm. Journal of Paediatrics & Child Health, 44 5: 281-284. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2007.01256.x


Author Pritchard, Margo A.
Colditz, Paul B.
Beller, Elaine M.
Title Parental experiences and preferences which influence subsequent use of post-discharge health services for children born very preterm
Journal name Journal of Paediatrics & Child Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1754
Publication date 2008-05-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2007.01256.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 44
Issue 5
Start page 281
End page 284
Total pages 3
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Subject C1
920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
111403 Paediatrics
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Abstract Aim: Parents are ultimately responsible for organising and accessing health services for their children. How parents experience those services are likely to influence subsequent use. Understanding parental preference for service provision can inform compliance strategies with recommended child health recommendations. The aim of this study was to explore parental experiences and preferences which influence subsequent use of post-discharge health services for children born preterm with a birthweight <= 1250 g.
Formatted abstract
Aim: Parents are ultimately responsible for organising and accessing health services for their children. How parents experience those services are likely to influence subsequent use. Understanding parental preference for service provision can inform compliance strategies with recommended child health recommendations. The aim of this study was to explore parental experiences and preferences which influence subsequent use of post-discharge health services for children born preterm with a birthweight ≤1250 g.

Methods: Focus groups consisted of randomly selected families recruited from a population-based cross-sectional cohort study of 2-, 4- and 7-year-old children corrected age for prematurity. Parents were asked to consider which aspects of childhood health service delivery influenced subsequent use. Transcripts were analysed and themes constructed. SWOT analysis evaluated health service practices by systematically mapping parents' accounts of the perceived strengths (S), weaknesses (W), opportunities (O) and threats (T) of services in relation to subsequent use.

Results: Fifteen parents participated in three groups (by children's age). Three dominant themes emerged and included (i) assistance with accessing appropriate services; (ii) provision of consistent information and comprehensive child health records; and (iii) support of parental self-efficacy in the health care of their child.

Conclusion: Primary health carers are ideally suited to co-ordinate and provide continuity to improve parental involvement and compliance with health promoting recommendations for their preterm children. This approach may improve interagency co-operation and access to services enabling early identification and intervention. Adopting these strategies may be effective in optimising child health follow-up strategies and improve uptake of recommended intervention and prevention programmes.
© 2007 The Authors
Journal compilation © 2007 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians)


Keyword Family
Focus group
Health service group
Preterm
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 25 Nov 2007

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2009, 00:21:08 EST by Amanda Barnett on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences