The Trojan Horse of Nurse Education

Watson, Roger and Thompson, David R. (2004) The Trojan Horse of Nurse Education. Nurse Education Today, 24 2: 73-75. doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2004.01.001


Author Watson, Roger
Thompson, David R.
Title The Trojan Horse of Nurse Education
Journal name Nurse Education Today   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0260-6917
Publication date 2004-02-01
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2004.01.001
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 73
End page 75
Total pages 3
Place of publication Edinburgh
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Language eng
Subject 1110 Nursing
Formatted abstract
Since the mid 1990s nurse education in the United Kingdom (UK) has been wholly located within the higher education sector. This move completed what began in the late 1980s with the closure of traditional, hospital based, schools of nursing and their merger across several hospitals, into colleges of nursing. The move into higher education took place because there was evidence that those nurses already educated in the higher education sector were good value for money. Nursing had long been exhorted to develop its own research base and it was felt that exposure to the higher education sector proper – where teaching and research went hand in hand – would be sufficient stimulus to effect this on a wide scale. Therefore, in the past decade many UK universities old, established and new have found an income stream from the education of thousands of nurses and, in this process, many hundreds of staff formerly employed in the colleges of nursing have been grafted in to the UK university system.

Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Available online 21 January 2004.

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 36 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 28 Mar 2009, 02:42:11 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work