Recent advances in the development of transgenic papaya technology

Mendoza, E.M.T., Laurena, A.C. and Botella, J.R. (2008) Recent advances in the development of transgenic papaya technology. Biotechnology Annual Review, 14 423-461. doi:10.1016/S1387-2656(08)00019-7


Author Mendoza, E.M.T.
Laurena, A.C.
Botella, J.R.
Title Recent advances in the development of transgenic papaya technology
Journal name Biotechnology Annual Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1387-2656
ISBN 978-0-08-088808-8
Publication date 2008-07-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S1387-2656(08)00019-7
Open Access Status
Volume 14
Start page 423
End page 461
Total pages 19
Editor ElGewely, MR
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier B V
Language eng
Subject C1
8202 Horticultural Crops
060702 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
Abstract Papaya with resistance to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is the first genetically modified tree and fruit crop and also the first transgenic crop developed by a public institution that has been commercialized. This chapter reviews the different transformation systems used for papaya and recent advances in the use of transgenic technology to introduce important quality and horticultural traits in papaya. These include the development of the following traits in papaya: resistance to PRSV, mites and Phytophthora, delayed ripening trait or long shelf life by inhibiting ethylene production or reducing loss of firmness, and tolerance or resistance to herbicide and aluminum toxicity. The use of papaya to produce vaccine against tuberculosis and cysticercosis, an infectious animal disease, has also been explored. Because of the economic importance of papaya, there are several collaborative and independent efforts to develop PRSV transgenic papaya technology in 14 countries. This chapter further reviews the strategies and constraints in the adoption of the technology and biosafety to the environment and food safety. Constraints to adoption include public perception, strict and expensive regulatory procedures and intellectual property issues.
Formatted abstract
Papaya with resistance to papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is the first genetically modified tree and fruit crop and also the first transgenic crop developed by a public institution that has been commercialized. This chapter reviews the different transformation systems used for papaya and recent advances in the use of transgenic technology to introduce important quality and horticultural traits in papaya. These include the development of the following traits in papaya: resistance to PRSV, mites and Phytophthora, delayed ripening trait or long shelf life by inhibiting ethylene production or reducing loss of firmness, and tolerance or resistance to herbicide and aluminum toxicity. The use of papaya to produce vaccine against tuberculosis and cysticercosis, an infectious animal disease, has also been explored. Because of the economic importance of papaya, there are several collaborative and independent efforts to develop PRSV transgenic papaya technology in 14 countries. This chapter further reviews the strategies and constraints in the adoption of the technology and biosafety to the environment and food safety. Constraints to adoption include public perception, strict and expensive regulatory procedures and intellectual property issues.
Keyword Papaya
Carica papaya
Transgenic
genetically modified
Biosafety
PRSV-resistant papaya
Long shelf life papaya
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2009, 19:42:21 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences