Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior to Inform Change Management: An Investigation of Employee Intentions to Support Organizational Change

Jimmieson, Nerina L., Peach, Megan and White, Katherine M. (2008) Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior to Inform Change Management: An Investigation of Employee Intentions to Support Organizational Change. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 44 2: 237-262. doi:10.1177/0021886307312773


Author Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Peach, Megan
White, Katherine M.
Title Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior to Inform Change Management: An Investigation of Employee Intentions to Support Organizational Change
Formatted title
Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior to Inform Change Management
An Investigation of Employee Intentions to Support Organizational Change
Journal name The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8863
Publication date 2008-02-06
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0021886307312773
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 44
Issue 2
Start page 237
End page 262
Total pages 26
Editor Woodman, Richard W.
Marshall, Laurie R.
Place of publication United States
Publisher Sage Publications, Inc.
Language eng
Subject C1
170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Utilizing the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a framework for understanding employee intentions to support organizational change, this study examined the extent to which attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC) and the interactive effect of group norm and ingroup identification predicted intentions to carry out change-supportive activities. It also was hypothesized that communication and participation would increase intentions, with these relationships mediated by the TPB variables. The sample was 149 employees undergoing the first phase of a building relocation. Attitude, subjective norm, and PBC each predicted intentions. A significant interaction emerged, with group norm predicting intentions only for employees who identified strongly with their reference group. Employees who perceived sufficient information about the relocation reported stronger intentions, an effect that was partially mediated via subjective norm and PBC. Similarly, participation predicted intentions via subjective norm. Implications for fostering employee readiness for change are discussed.
Keyword theory of planned behavior
organizational change
readiness for change
change management strategies
intentions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 54 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2009, 02:48:17 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology