Everyday social and conversation applications of theory-of-mind understanding by children with autism-spectrum disorders or typical development

Peterson, Candida C., Garnett, Michelle, Kelly, Adrian B. and Attwood, Tony (2009) Everyday social and conversation applications of theory-of-mind understanding by children with autism-spectrum disorders or typical development. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 18 2: 105-115. doi:10.1007/s00787-008-0711-y


Author Peterson, Candida C.
Garnett, Michelle
Kelly, Adrian B.
Attwood, Tony
Title Everyday social and conversation applications of theory-of-mind understanding by children with autism-spectrum disorders or typical development
Journal name European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1435-165X
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00787-008-0711-y
Open Access Status
Volume 18
Issue 2
Start page 105
End page 115
Total pages 11
Editor Gillberg, Dr. Christopher
Buitelaar, Jan K.
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Steinkopff
Language eng
Subject C1
170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
920501 Child Health
Abstract Children with autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) often fail laboratory false-belief tests of theory of mind (ToM). Yet how this impacts on their everyday social behavior is less clear, partly owing to uncertainty over which specific everyday conversational and social skills require ToM understanding. A new caregiver-report scale of these everyday applications of ToM was developed and validated in two studies. Study 1 obtained parent ratings of 339 children (85 with autism; 230 with Asperger's; 24 typically-developing) on the new scale and results revealed (a) that the scale had good psychometric properties and (b) that children with ASD had significantly more everyday mindreading difficulties than typical developers. In Study 2, we directly tested links between laboratory ToM and everyday mindreading using teacher ratings on the new scale. The sample of 25 children included 15 with autism and 10 typical developers aged 5-12 years. Children in both groups who passed laboratory ToM tests had fewer everyday mindreading difficulties than those of the same diagnosis who failed. Yet, intriguingly, autistic ToM-passers still had more problems with everyday mindreading than younger typically-developing ToM-failers. The possible roles of family conversation and peer interaction, along with ToM, in everyday social functioning were considered.
Keyword autism
Asperger's disorder
theory-of-mind
conversation
social skill
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online in 2008. Printed publication not until 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2009, 00:21:11 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology