Presence of the newly discovered human polyomaviruses KI and WU in Australian patients with acute respiratory tract infection

Bialasiewicz, S., Whiley, D. M., Lambert, S. B., Jacob, K., Bletchly, C., Wang, D., Nissen, M. D. and Sloots, T. P. (2008) Presence of the newly discovered human polyomaviruses KI and WU in Australian patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Journal of Clinical Virology, 41 2: 63-68. doi:10.1016/j.jcv.2007.11.001


Author Bialasiewicz, S.
Whiley, D. M.
Lambert, S. B.
Jacob, K.
Bletchly, C.
Wang, D.
Nissen, M. D.
Sloots, T. P.
Title Presence of the newly discovered human polyomaviruses KI and WU in Australian patients with acute respiratory tract infection
Journal name Journal of Clinical Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1386-6532
Publication date 2008-02-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcv.2007.11.001
Open Access Status
Volume 41
Issue 2
Start page 63
End page 68
Total pages 6
Editor C. Ginocchio
W. F. Carman
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject C1
920109 Infectious Diseases
920115 Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma)
920501 Child Health
110804 Medical Virology
111706 Epidemiology
Abstract Background: Currently, the role of the novel human polyomaviruses, KI (KIV) and WU (WUV) as agents of human disease remains uncertain. Objectives: We sought to determine the prevalence of these viruses and their rate of co-detection with other viral respiratory pathogens, in an Australian population. Study design: Polymerase chain reaction assays previously described were used to examine the presence of KIV and WUV in 2866 respiratory specimens collected from January to December 2003 from Australian patients with acute respiratory infections. Results: KIV and WUV were present in our population with an annual prevalence of 2.6% and 4.5%, respectively. There was no apparent seasonal variation for KIV, but a predominance of infection was detected during late winter to early summer for WUV. The level of co-infection of KIV or WUV with other respiratory viruses was 74.7% and 79.7%, respectively. Both viruses were absent from urine and blood specimens collected from a variety of patient sources. Conclusions: KIV and WUV circulate annually in the Australian population. Although there is a strong association with the respiratory tract, more comprehensive studies are required to prove these viruses are agents causing respiratory disease. Crown Copyright
Formatted abstract
Background
Currently, the role of the novel human polyomaviruses, KI (KIV) and WU (WUV) as agents of human disease remains uncertain.

Objectives
We sought to determine the prevalence of these viruses and their rate of co-detection with other viral respiratory pathogens, in an Australian population. Study design Polymerase chain reaction assays previously described were used to examine the presence of KIV and WUV in 2866 respiratory specimens collected from January to December 2003 from Australian patients with acute respiratory infections.

Results

KIV and WUV were present in our population with an annual prevalence of 2.6% and 4.5%, respectively. There was no apparent seasonal variation for KIV, but a predominance of infection was detected during late winter to early summer for WUV. The level of co-infection of KIV or WUV with other respiratory viruses was 74.7% and 79.7%, respectively. Both viruses were absent from urine and blood specimens collected from a variety of patient sources.

Conclusions

KIV and WUV circulate annually in the Australian population. Although there is a strong association with the respiratory tract, more comprehensive studies are required to prove these viruses are agents causing respiratory disease.
Keyword Human polyomavirus
Acute respiratory infection
Respiratory viruses
Molecular
Clinical
Emerging virus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2009, 00:11:08 EST by Lesley Arnicar on behalf of Clinical Medical Virology Centre