A longitudinal analysis of older Australian women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, 1996-2005

Adams, Jon, Sibbritt, David and Young, Anne F. (2009) A longitudinal analysis of older Australian women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, 1996-2005. Age and Ageing, 38 1: 93-99. doi:10.1093/ageing/afn241


Author Adams, Jon
Sibbritt, David
Young, Anne F.
Title A longitudinal analysis of older Australian women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, 1996-2005
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
1468-2834
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afn241
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 1
Start page 93
End page 99
Total pages 6
Editor Roger Francis
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified
Abstract Objective: to determine the factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among older Australian women over time. Methods: a longitudinal analysis of postal questionnaires completed in 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2005 as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Results: the percentage of women who consulted a CAM practitioner in the years 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2005 were 14.6%, 12.1%, 10.9% and 9.9%;, respectively. Use of CAM increased as the number of reported symptoms increased and physical health deteriorated, for non-urban residents compared to urban residents. Conclusion: use of CAM amongst older women appears to be strongly influenced by poor physical health. There is also a suggestion that lack of access to conventional health care providers increases CAM use. There is also an overall decline in the use of CAM among older women as they age.
Formatted abstract
 Objective: to determine the factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among older Australian women over time.

Methods: a longitudinal analysis of postal questionnaires completed in 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2005 as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Results: the percentage of women who consulted a CAM practitioner in the years 1996, 1999, 2002 and 2005 were 14.6%, 12.1%, 10.9% and 9.9%, respectively. Use of CAM increased as the number of reported symptoms increased and physical health deteriorated, for non-urban residents compared to urban residents.

Conclusion: use of CAM amongst older women appears to be strongly influenced by poor physical health. There is also a suggestion that lack of access to conventional health care providers increases CAM use. There is also an overall decline in the use of CAM among older women as they age.

Keyword complementary and alternative medicine
complementary therapies
longitudinal studies
older women
elderly
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes E-publication - Age and Ageing Advance Access originally published online on November 18, 2008

 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2009, 01:37:46 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health