The impact of perceived stage of cancer on carers’ anxiety and depression during the patients’ final year of life

Burridge, Letitia, Barnett, Adrian G. and Clavarino, Alexandra M. (2009) The impact of perceived stage of cancer on carers’ anxiety and depression during the patients’ final year of life. Psycho-Oncology, 18 6: 615-623. doi:10.1002/pon.1435


Author Burridge, Letitia
Barnett, Adrian G.
Clavarino, Alexandra M.
Title The impact of perceived stage of cancer on carers’ anxiety and depression during the patients’ final year of life
Journal name Psycho-Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1057-9249
1099-1611
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/pon.1435
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 18
Issue 6
Start page 615
End page 623
Total pages 9
Editor J. C. Holland
M. Waston
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Language eng
Subject C1
920202 Carer Health
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Abstract Objective: This paper explores the effects of perceived stage of cancer (PSOC) on carers' anxiety and depression during the patients' final year.
Formatted abstract
Objective: This paper explores the effects of perceived stage of cancer (PSOC) on carers' anxiety and depression during the patients' final year.

Methods: A consecutive sample of patients and carers (N=98) were surveyed at regular intervals regarding PSOC, and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Means were compared by gender using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The chi-square was used to analyse categorical data. Agreement between carers' and patients' PSOC was estimated using kappa statistics. Correlations between carers' PSOC and their anxiety and depression were calculated using the Spearman's rank correlation.

Results: Over time, an increasing proportion of carers reported that the cancer was advanced, culminating at 43% near death. Agreement regarding PSOC was fair (kappa=0.29-0.34) until near death (kappa=0.21). Carers' anxiety increased over the year; depression increased in the final 6 months. Females were more anxious (p=0.049, 6 months; p=0.009, 3 months) than males, and more depressed until 1 month to death. The proportion of carers reporting moderate-severe anxiety almost doubled over the year to 27%, with more females in this category at 6 months (p=0.05). Carers with moderate-severe depression increased from 6 to 15% over the year. Increased PSOC was weakly correlated with increased anxiety and depression.

Conclusions: Carers' anxiety exceeded depression in severity during advanced cancer. Females generally experienced greater anxiety and depression. Carers were more realistic than patients regarding the ultimate outcome, which was reflected in their declining mental health, particularly near the end. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keyword advanced cancer
oncology
perceived cancer stage
anxiety
depression
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 991215
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 19 Nov 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 26 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 26 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2009, 00:25:54 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health