How will information about the genetic risk of mental disorders impact on stigma?

Spriggs, Merle, Olsson, Craig A. and Hall, Wayne D. (2008) How will information about the genetic risk of mental disorders impact on stigma?. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 42 3: 214-220. doi:10.1080/00048670701827226


Author Spriggs, Merle
Olsson, Craig A.
Hall, Wayne D.
Title How will information about the genetic risk of mental disorders impact on stigma?
Journal name Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1614
0004-8674
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00048670701827226
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 42
Issue 3
Start page 214
End page 220
Total pages 7
Editor Peter Joyce
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject C1
920410 Mental Health
111714 Mental Health
Abstract Objectives: To suggest ways of testing hypotheses about the impact that information on genetic risk may have on the social stigma of mental disorders and to analyse the implications of these hypotheses for genetic screening for mental disorders.
Formatted abstract
Objectives:
To suggest ways of testing hypotheses about the impact that information on genetic risk may have on the social stigma of mental disorders and to analyse the implications of these hypotheses for genetic screening for mental disorders.

Method:
Literature review and critical analysis and synthesis.

Results:
An optimistic view is that information on the genetic risk for mental disorders will reduce blame and social stigma experienced by individuals living with mental disorder. A more pessimists view is that genetic risk information and the use of predictive genetic testing will lead to earlier stigmatization of those at risk of mental disorders. Research is identified that is needed to provide a better understanding of the implications of predictive genetic testing for the stigmatization of different mental health disorders.

Conclusions:
It is essential that research on the genetics of mental disorders is accompanied by social science research on the ways in which genetic findings influence the lives of those who are tested.
Keyword ethics
genetic screening
informed consent
mental disorders
stereotyping
stigmatization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2009, 00:00:38 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health