Exploring 'best practice' for nucleic acid detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Whiley, David M., Garland, Suzanne M., Harnett, Geoffrey, Lum, Gary, Smith, David W., Tabrizi, Sepehr N., Sloots, Theo P. and Tapsall, John W. (2008) Exploring 'best practice' for nucleic acid detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Sexual Health, 5 1: 17-23. doi:10.1071/SH07050


Author Whiley, David M.
Garland, Suzanne M.
Harnett, Geoffrey
Lum, Gary
Smith, David W.
Tabrizi, Sepehr N.
Sloots, Theo P.
Tapsall, John W.
Title Exploring 'best practice' for nucleic acid detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Formatted title
Exploring 'best practice' for nucleic acid detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
Journal name Sexual Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1448-5028
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/SH07050
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 1
Start page 17
End page 23
Total pages 7
Editor M. V.Reitano
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
060502 Infectious Agents
060503 Microbial Genetics
060506 Virology
920109 Infectious Diseases
Abstract Nucleic acid detection tests (NADT) have considerable benefits for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC), including high sensitivity across a range of specimen types and use under widely differing settings and conditions. However, sexual health practitioners and others who use data generated by NADT for GC should be aware of some important limitations of these tests. False-positive results caused by cross reaction with commensal Neisseria species have been observed in many assays, and have lead to unacceptably low positive-predictive values in some patient populations. Further, false-negative results can be caused by GC sequence variation, with some gonococci lacking certain NADT target sequences. This review examines the issues associated with gonococcal NADT and considers best practice for use of these assays based on current knowledge. We emphasise the need for supplementary testing and extensive assay validation, and suggest appropriate strategies for these requirements irrespective of the setting in which they are used. Further, we highlight the need to maintain culture-based testing for certain specimen sites as well as for antimicrobial resistance surveillance.
Formatted abstract
Nucleic acid detection tests (NADT) have considerable benefits for the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC), including high sensitivity across a range of specimen types and use under widely differing settings and conditions. However, sexual health practitioners and others who use data generated by NADT for GC should be aware of some important limitations of these tests. False-positive results caused by cross reaction with commensal Neisseria species have been observed in many assays, and have lead to unacceptably low positive-predictive values in some patient populations. Further, false-negative results can be caused by GC sequence variation, with some gonococci lacking certain NADT target sequences. This review examines the issues associated with gonococcal NADT and considers best practice for use of these assays based on current knowledge. We emphasise the need for supplementary testing and extensive assay validation, and suggest appropriate strategies for these requirements irrespective of the setting in which they are used. Further, we highlight the need to maintain culture-based testing for certain specimen sites as well as for antimicrobial resistance surveillance.

Keyword best practice
Neisseria gonorrhoeae GC
NADT
Nucleic acid detection tests
assay validation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Clinical Medical Virology Centre Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 33 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 39 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2009, 23:11:03 EST by Lesley Arnicar on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences