Quasi-Monte Carlo simulation of the light environment of plants

Cieslak, M., Lemieux, C., Hanan, J. S. and Prusinkiewicz, P. (2008) Quasi-Monte Carlo simulation of the light environment of plants. Functional Plant Biology, 35 9 & 10: 837-849. doi:10.1071/FP08082


Author Cieslak, M.
Lemieux, C.
Hanan, J. S.
Prusinkiewicz, P.
Title Quasi-Monte Carlo simulation of the light environment of plants
Journal name Functional Plant Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-4408
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/FP08082
Open Access Status
Volume 35
Issue 9 & 10
Start page 837
End page 849
Total pages 13
Editor Munns, R.
Place of publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Language eng
Subject C1
060808 Invertebrate Biology
080110 Simulation and Modelling
970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
820205 Kiwifruit
Abstract The distribution of light in the canopy is a major factor regulating the growth and development of a plant. The main variables of interest are the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) reaching different elements of the plant canopy, and the quality (spectral composition) of light reaching these elements. A light environment model based on Monte Carlo (MC) path tracing of photons, capable of computing both PAR and the spectral composition of light, was developed by Měch (1997), and can be conveniently interfaced with virtual plants expressed using the open L-system formalism. To improve the efficiency of the light distribution calculations provided by Měch’s MonteCarlo program, we have implemented a similar program QuasiMC, which supports a more efficient randomised quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method (RQMC). We have validated QuasiMC by comparing it with MonteCarlo and with the radiosity-based CARIBU software (Chelle et al. 2004), and we show that these two programs produce consistent results. We also assessed the performance of the RQMC path tracing algorithm by comparing it with Monte Carlo path tracing and confirmed that RQMC offers a speed and/or accuracy improvement over MC.
Formatted abstract
The distribution of light in the canopy is a major factor regulating the growth and development of a plant. The main variables of interest are the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) reaching different elements of the plant canopy, and the quality (spectral composition) of light reaching these elements. A light environment model based on Monte Carlo (MC) path tracing of photons, capable of computing both PAR and the spectral composition of light, was developed by Měch (1997), and can be conveniently interfaced with virtual plants expressed using the open L-system formalism. To improve the efficiency of the light distribution calculations provided by Měch’s MonteCarlo program, we have implemented a similar program QuasiMC, which supports a more efficient randomised quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method (RQMC). We have validated QuasiMC by comparing it with MonteCarlo and with the radiosity-based CARIBU software (Chelle et al. 2004), and we show that these two programs produce consistent results. We also assessed the performance of the RQMC path tracing algorithm by comparing it with Monte Carlo path tracing and confirmed that RQMC offers a speed and/or accuracy improvement over MC.

Keyword light simulation
open L-system
PAR
path tracing
red/far red ratio
randomised) quasi-Monte Carlo sampling
variance reduction
virtual plant modelling
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Mathematics and Physics
 
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Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2009, 21:51:53 EST by Marie Grove on behalf of School of Mathematics & Physics