Hot summers and heart failure: Seasonal variations in morbidity and mortality in Australian heart failure patients (1994-2005)

Inglis, Sally C., Clarke, Robyn A., Shakib, Sepehr, Wong, Denis T., Molaee, Payman, Wilkinson, David and Stewart, Simon (2008) Hot summers and heart failure: Seasonal variations in morbidity and mortality in Australian heart failure patients (1994-2005). European Journal of Heart Failure, 10 6: 540-549. doi:10.1016/j.ejheart.2008.03.008


Author Inglis, Sally C.
Clarke, Robyn A.
Shakib, Sepehr
Wong, Denis T.
Molaee, Payman
Wilkinson, David
Stewart, Simon
Title Hot summers and heart failure: Seasonal variations in morbidity and mortality in Australian heart failure patients (1994-2005)
Journal name European Journal of Heart Failure   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1388-9842; 879-0844; 567-4215
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ejheart.2008.03.008
Open Access Status
Volume 10
Issue 6
Start page 540
End page 549
Total pages 10
Editor Karl Swedburg
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases)
920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
Formatted abstract
Background: There are minimal reports of seasonal variations in chronic heart failure (CHF)-related morbidity and mortality beyond the northern hemisphere.
Aims and methods: We examined potential seasonal variations with respect to morbidity and all-cause mortality over more than a decade in a cohort of 2961 patients with CHF from a tertiary referral hospital in South Australia subject to mild winters and hot summers.
Results: Seasonal variation across all event-types was observed. CHF-related morbidity peaked in winter (July) and was lowest in summer (February): 70 (95% CI: 65 to 76) vs. 33 (95% CI: 30 to 37) admissions/1000 at risk (pb0.005). All-cause admissions (113 (95% CI: 107 to 120) vs. 73 (95% CI 68 to 79) admissions/1000 at risk, pb0.001) and concurrent respiratory disease (21% vs. 12%, pb0.001) were consistently higher in winter. 2010 patients died, mortality was highest in August relative to February: 23 (95% CI: 20 to 27) vs. 12 (95% CI: 10 to 15) deaths per 1000 at risk, pb0.001. Those aged 75 years or older were most at risk of seasonal variations in morbidity and mortality.
Conclusion: Seasonal variations in CHF-related morbidity and mortality occur in the hot climate of South Australia, suggesting that relative (rather than absolute) changes in temperature drive this global phenomenon.
© 2008 European Society of Cardiology

Keyword Chronic heart failure
Mortality - morbidity
Morbidity
Seasonality
Temperature
Hospitalisation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2009, 04:20:55 EST by Helen Spindler on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences