Does temperature modify short-term effects of ozone on total mortality in 60 large eastern US communities? An assessment using the NMMAPS data

Ren, Cizao, Williams, Gail M., Mengersen, Kerrie, Morawska, Lidia and Tong, Shilu (2008) Does temperature modify short-term effects of ozone on total mortality in 60 large eastern US communities? An assessment using the NMMAPS data. Environmental International, 34 4: 451-458. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2007.10.001


Author Ren, Cizao
Williams, Gail M.
Mengersen, Kerrie
Morawska, Lidia
Tong, Shilu
Title Does temperature modify short-term effects of ozone on total mortality in 60 large eastern US communities? An assessment using the NMMAPS data
Journal name Environmental International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0160-4120
1873-6750
Publication date 2008-05-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2007.10.001
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 4
Start page 451
End page 458
Total pages 8
Editor Ruth E. Alcock
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, UK
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject C1
920405 Environmental Health
111706 Epidemiology
Abstract Many studies have indicated that ozone is associated with morbidity and mortality. A few studies have reported that the association is heterogeneous across seasons and geographic regions. However, little information is available on whether both temperature and geographic factors simultaneously modify the ozone effect. This study used a Poisson regression model to explore whether temperature modifies the effect of ozone on mortality in the 60 large eastern US communities during April to October, 1987–2000. Results show that temperature modified ozone-mortality associations and that such modification varied across geographic regions. In the northeast region, a 10-ppb increment in ozone was associated with an increase of 2.22% (95% posterior interval [PI]: 1.19%, 3.13%), 3.06% (95% PI: 2.21%, 3.76%) and 6.22% (95% PI: 4.77%, 7.56%) in mortality at low, moderate and high temperature level, respectively, while in the southeast region a 10-ppb increment in ozone was associated with an increase of 1.13% (95% PI:− 1.12%, 3.18%), 1.50% (95% PI: 0.22%, 2.81%) and 1.29% (95% PI:− 0.33%, 2.96%) in mortality, respectively. We concluded that temperature synergistically modified the ozone-mortality association in the northeast region, but such a pattern was not apparent in the southeast region. Thus, both temperature and geographic factors should be considered in the assessment of ozone effects.
Keyword Poisson regression model
Ozone
Temperature
Mortality
Interaction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 25 Mar 2009, 01:42:14 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health