Cowboys, cowoks, beachboys and bombs: Matching identity to changing socioeconomic realities in post-2005 North Bali

Jennaway, Megan (2008) Cowboys, cowoks, beachboys and bombs: Matching identity to changing socioeconomic realities in post-2005 North Bali. The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 9 1: 47-65. doi:10.1080/14442210701822209

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Author Jennaway, Megan
Title Cowboys, cowoks, beachboys and bombs: Matching identity to changing socioeconomic realities in post-2005 North Bali
Journal name The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 144-2213, 1740-9314
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14442210701822209
Open Access Status
Volume 9
Issue 1
Start page 47
End page 65
Total pages 19
Editor Kathryn Robinson
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Routledge Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject C1
920503 Health Related to Specific Ethnic Groups
160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology
Abstract The collapse of the tourist industry in Bali since late 2002 has had devastating effects on the lives of those who depended on tourism for their livelihood. This sector comprises a vast array of market segments, from those directly employed in hotels, restaurants and retail outlets, or those sustained by an ebullient domestic and export-oriented arts and crafts industry, to the miscellaneous self-employed who predicate their economic strategies on a guaranteed supply of tourists. The present paper examines one such group, the beachboys (cowok), who loiter around the beaches, cafes and bars of Lovina, North Bali, in hope of striking a love match with a foreigner. Such matches are perceived as providing a means of migration to an affluent Western or East Asian country, conceptualised as a place of fantastic wealth and opulence. Although this strategy frequently bore fruit during the prolonged tourism boom of the late 20th century, in the wake of the second series of terrorist bombings, occurring on October 2, 2005, it has foundered. Tourists have deserted the island in droves. The consequent economic and social vacuum so created is not only undermining beachboys' aspirations for a luxurious life abroad, it may also be transforming the fundamental pattern of foreigner-local interactions in North and even South Bali. The present paper points to the implications of some of these macroeconomic and social changes for the ways in which North Balinese beachboys construct their identity as cowoks, both now and in the future.
Keyword Beachboy
Bomb
Cowok
Economy
Holiday
Leisure
Recession
Romance
Sex
Tourism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 24 Mar 2009, 23:24:32 EST by Geraldine Fitzgerald on behalf of School of Public Health