Clinical location and student learning: Outcomes from the LCAP program in Queensland, Australia

Young, Louise, Rego, Patricia and Peterson, Ray (2008) Clinical location and student learning: Outcomes from the LCAP program in Queensland, Australia. Teaching and Learning in Medicine: An international journal, 20 3: 261-266. doi:10.1080/10401330802199583


Author Young, Louise
Rego, Patricia
Peterson, Ray
Title Clinical location and student learning: Outcomes from the LCAP program in Queensland, Australia
Journal name Teaching and Learning in Medicine: An international journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1532-8015
1040-1334
Publication date 2008-07-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10401330802199583
Open Access Status
Volume 20
Issue 3
Start page 261
End page 266
Total pages 6
Editor J. A. Colliver
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject C1
130103 Higher Education
139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Abstract Background: Three students in the 3rd year of a graduate entry medical program self-selected to participate in a 1-year clinical placement, each with a rural general practitioner in central western Queensland, Australia. Description: Students completed 32 weeks in a rural generalist community immersion medical program and were compared with matched students who completed their year in urban tertiary hospitals. Evaluations included teaching and learning opportunities, assessment of clinical competencies, and semistructured interviews. Views of preceptors, spouses, and community were also evaluated. Evaluation: All outcome measures were positive and many were greater for the rural immersion students than for the matched urban group. Students were able to achieve the requirements of their medical program in a nontraditional placement. Views of preceptors indicated satisfaction with long-term medical student placements including enjoyment, negligible time or financial impact, and beneficial professional and collegial support. Conclusions: Long-term immersion placements benefited student learning and had a favorable impact on the preceptors. Copyright
Formatted abstract
 Background:
Three students in the 3rd year of a graduate entry medical program self-selected to participate in a 1-year clinical placement, each with a rural general practitioner in central western Queensland, Australia.

Description:

Students completed 32 weeks in a rural generalist community immersion medical program and were compared with matched students who completed their year in urban tertiary hospitals. Evaluations included teaching and learning opportunities, assessment of clinical competencies, and semistructured interviews. Views of preceptors, spouses, and community were also evaluated.

Evaluation:

All outcome measures were positive and many were greater for the rural immersion students than for the matched urban group. Students were able to achieve the requirements of their medical program in a nontraditional placement. Views of preceptors indicated satisfaction with long-term medical student placements including enjoyment, negligible time or financial impact, and beneficial professional and collegial support.

Conclusions:

Long-term immersion placements benefited student learning and had a favorable impact on the preceptors.
Keyword Medical students
Rural Australia
Undergraduate
Performance
Education
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Mar 2009, 05:03:43 EST by Helen Spindler on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences