Follow-up difficulty: Correlates and relationship with outcome in heroin dependence treatment in the NEPOD study

Digiusto, Erol, Panjari, Mary, Gibson, Amy, Rea, Felicity, The Nepod Research Group and Doran, Chris (2006) Follow-up difficulty: Correlates and relationship with outcome in heroin dependence treatment in the NEPOD study. Addictive Behaviors, 31 7: 1201-1210. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2005.09.004


Author Digiusto, Erol
Panjari, Mary
Gibson, Amy
Rea, Felicity
The Nepod Research Group
Doran, Chris
Title Follow-up difficulty: Correlates and relationship with outcome in heroin dependence treatment in the NEPOD study
Journal name Addictive Behaviors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Publication date 2006-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2005.09.004
Open Access Status
Volume 31
Issue 7
Start page 1201
End page 1210
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract Data collected from 317 heroin users who participated in four studies that were included in the Australian National Evaluation of Pharmacotherapies for Opioid Dependence were analysed to examine predictors of followup difficulty and whether follow-up difficulty was related to heroin use outcomes. Participants who were no longer receiving treatment were more difficult to contact and more likely to be lost to follow-up. Participants treated in general practice settings were also more difficult to contact and more likely to be lost to follow-up than participants treated at specialist clinics. Contact difficulty among followed-up participants (either in or out of treatment) was unrelated to heroin use outcomes. The 21% of participants who were followed-up with just one contact attempt reported 20.0 heroin-free days in the previous month, increasing only slightly to 20.9 based on the 70% of participants eventually contacted after up to 20 attempts. The study examined three methods for imputing missing heroin use outcome data and concluded that imputation of missing outcome data by inserting corresponding baseline data may be too conservative.
Keyword Opioid dependence
Follow-up difficulty
Tracking
Treatment outcome
NEPOD
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes The NEPOD Research group consists of (listed alphabetically): Robert Ali, Gabriele Bammer, James Bell, Courtney Breen, Erol Digiusto, Chris Doran, Jenny Gates, Nicholas Glasgow, Elena Gospodarevskaya, Anthony Harris, Lynn Hawken, Nicky Henderson, Jo Kimber, Nick Lintzeris, Phil Marshall, Richard P. Mattick, Susannah O'Brien, Allan Quigley, Alison Ritter, John B. Saunders, Anthony Shakeshaft, Marian Shanahan, James Shearer, Jason White

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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