Indigeneity, ferality, and what 'belongs' in the Australian bush: Aboriginal responses to 'introduced' animals and plants in a settler-descendant society

Trigger, D. (2008) Indigeneity, ferality, and what 'belongs' in the Australian bush: Aboriginal responses to 'introduced' animals and plants in a settler-descendant society. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 14 3: 628-646. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9655.2008.00521.x

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Trigger, D.
Title Indigeneity, ferality, and what 'belongs' in the Australian bush: Aboriginal responses to 'introduced' animals and plants in a settler-descendant society
Journal name Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1359-0987
1467-9655
Publication date 2008-09-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9655.2008.00521.x
Volume 14
Issue 3
Start page 628
End page 646
Total pages 19
Editor Simon Coleman
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
160104 Social and Cultural Anthropology
970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
Abstract This article investigates responses among Aboriginal people in Australia to animals and plants introduced through the process of British colonization. While there is some rejection of exotic species as emblematic of European dispossession, the article explores cases where certain fauna and flora have been embraced intellectually within Aboriginal cultural traditions. The broader discussion canvasses links in Australia between ideas of ‘nativeness’ in society and nature. If Indigenous people have incorporated non-native species, what are the implications for an Australian identity defined substantially in terms of ‘native’ landscapes? The article considers the significance of non-native nature for flexible constructions of cultural belonging among Aboriginal people in a post-colonial society. The concept of ‘emergent autochthony’ is proposed.
Keyword Aboriginal people
Australia
Non-native nature
Post-colonial society
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 28 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 40 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 24 Mar 2009, 00:55:08 EST by Margaret Gately on behalf of School of Social Science