Motor Coordination Can be Fully Understood Only by Studying Complex Movements

Cordo, Paul J. and Gurfinkel, Victor S. (2004). Motor Coordination Can be Fully Understood Only by Studying Complex Movements. In Shigemi Mori, Douglas G. Stuart and Mario Wiesendanger (Ed.), Brain Mechanisms for the Integration of Posture and Movement (pp. 29-38) Amsterdam: Elsevier. doi:10.1016/S0079-6123(03)43003-3


Author Cordo, Paul J.
Gurfinkel, Victor S.
Title of chapter Motor Coordination Can be Fully Understood Only by Studying Complex Movements
Title of book Brain Mechanisms for the Integration of Posture and Movement
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S0079-6123(03)43003-3
Open Access Status
Series Progress in Brain Research ; v. 143
ISBN 978-0-444-51389-2: 0-444-51389-2: 0079-6123
ISSN 0079-6123
Editor Shigemi Mori
Douglas G. Stuart
Mario Wiesendanger
Volume number 143
Start page 29
End page 38
Total pages 10
Language eng
Subjects 1109 Neurosciences
Abstract/Summary In this chapter, we use the sit-up to illustrate the complexity of coordination in movements that involve many muscles, joints, degrees of freedom, and high levels of muscle activity. Complex movements often involve the body axis. In addition to the intentional, focal part of any voluntary movement, complex movements also include "associated movements" that are not consciously controlled, but are necessary for the movement to succeed. Some associated movements serve a purpose, and others may not. During sitting up, the leg-lift is a purposive associated movement, whereas three-joint flexion is a non-purposive associated movement. The control of complex movements is also likely to be complex and, we argue, is hierarchically controlled. Associated movements may, themselves, be hierarchically organized and triggered by lower brain structures, local changes in neuronal excitability, and sensory feedback. Complex movements typically involve a high level of mobility. Because this mobility can lead to instability, anticipatory postural adjustments, a type of purposive associated movement, are commonly used to regulate posture. Thus, a number of important aspects of motor coordination can only be revealed by the study of complex movements.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Available online 28 November 2003

 
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Created: Mon, 23 Mar 2009, 21:25:34 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences