The influence of desk and display design on posture and muscle activity variability whilst performing information technology tasks

Straker, L., Burgess-Limerick, R., Pollock, C. and Maslen, B. (2009) The influence of desk and display design on posture and muscle activity variability whilst performing information technology tasks. Applied Ergonomics, 40 5: 852-859. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2008.09.004


Author Straker, L.
Burgess-Limerick, R.
Pollock, C.
Maslen, B.
Title The influence of desk and display design on posture and muscle activity variability whilst performing information technology tasks
Journal name Applied Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-6870
Publication date 2009-09-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2008.09.004
Open Access Status
Volume 40
Issue 5
Start page 852
End page 859
Total pages 8
Editor J. R. Wilson
K. C. Parsons
Place of publication Kidlington, OX
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject C1
920409 Injury Control
110601 Biomechanics
Abstract Desk design and computer display height can affect posture and muscle activation during computer use. Amplitudes of postural variables and muscle activity during computer use do not explain the results from epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders related to computer use. The purpose of this study was to assess variability of posture and muscle activity during work with two computer display heights and book/paper, in conjunction with a curved desk designed to provide forearm support and a traditional, straight desk. 18 male and 18 female participants performed 10-min tasks involving keying, mousing, reading and writing in six desk/display conditions. 3D posture and surface emg were assessed for the final 2 min of each task. The curved desk resulted in greater postural and muscle activity variation, suggesting an advantage of this supportive surface over the straight desk. There was little difference in variability associated with the two display heights. However, greater variability of posture and muscle activity was evident with the book/paper condition. Non-touch typists had greater neck flexion variation. The design of information technology tasks and workstations can influence the short term variation in posture and muscle activity. Variation is influenced independently of mean postures and muscle amplitudes and therefore needs to be considered to adequately assess the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.
Keyword Computer
Musculoskeletal disorder
Variation
Posture
Muscle activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 229011
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 22 Mar 2009, 20:54:57 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences