Effects of injectable vitamins A, D, E and C on the health and growth rate of feedlot cattle destined for the Australian domestic market

Cusack, P.M.V., McMeniman, Neil P. and Lean, I.J. (2008) Effects of injectable vitamins A, D, E and C on the health and growth rate of feedlot cattle destined for the Australian domestic market. Australian Veterinary Journal, 86 3: 81-87. doi:10.1111/j.1751-0813.2008.00255.x


Author Cusack, P.M.V.
McMeniman, Neil P.
Lean, I.J.
Title Effects of injectable vitamins A, D, E and C on the health and growth rate of feedlot cattle destined for the Australian domestic market
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2008.00255.x
Volume 86
Issue 3
Start page 81
End page 87
Total pages 7
Editor Jackson, A
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
070202 Animal Growth and Development
830301 Beef Cattle
Abstract Objective To examine the effects of injectable vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry on health and growth rate and the effects of injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) on cattle health. Design Systematic allocation of 2465 cattle at feedlot entry to: a commercial vitamin A, D and E preparation at the label dose rate; commercial vitamin A, D and E at twice the label dose rate; a formulation with no vitamin D, a lower concentration of vitamin A and a higher concentration of vitamin E; and the oil-based carrier alone at volumes corresponding to the above treatments. Comparisons of growth rate, disease and mortality were made between the groups at the conclusion of the feeding period. In a separate experiment, 176 cattle were alternately administered injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for BRD, or were not injected with vitamin C, and mortality was compared between the groups. Results There were no differences between cattle administered vitamin A, D and E at feedlot entry and the controls in growth rate (P = 0.11), all diseases (P = 0.99), BRD (P = 0.60) or mortalities (P = 0.95). Cattle treated with the higher vitamin E and lower vitamin A preparation had a higher (P = 0.02) incidence of anorexia than the other groups. Fewer cattle treated with 5 g of vitamin C by intramuscular injection at the time of treatment with antibiotics for BRD subsequently died (P = 0.04). Conclusions The routine injection of cattle with vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry is unlikely to result in improvements in health and growth rate where cattle are provided with these vitamins in their diets at concentrations equal to the National Research Council recommendations. Mortality rate in cattle diagnosed with BRD may be reduced by intramuscular injection of vitamin C at the time of treatment with antibiotics.
Formatted abstract
Objective To examine the effects of injectable vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry on health and growth rate and the effects of injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) on cattle health.

Design Systematic allocation of 2465 cattle at feedlot entry to: a commercial vitamin A, D and E preparation at the label dose rate; commercial vitamin A, D and E at twice the label dose rate; a formulation with no vitamin D, a lower concentration of vitamin A and a higher concentration of vitamin E; and the oil-based carrier alone at volumes corresponding to the above treatments. Comparisons of growth rate, disease and mortality were made between the groups at the conclusion of the feeding period. In a separate experiment, 176 cattle were alternately administered injectable vitamin C at the time of treatment for BRD, or were not injected with vitamin C, and mortality was compared between the groups.

Results There were no differences between cattle administered vitamin A, D and E at feedlot entry and the controls in growth rate (P = 0.11), all diseases (P = 0.99), BRD (P = 0.60) or mortalities (P = 0.95). Cattle treated with the higher vitamin E and lower vitamin A preparation had a higher (P = 0.02) incidence of anorexia than the other groups. Fewer cattle treated with 5 g of vitamin C by intramuscular injection at the time of treatment with antibiotics for BRD subsequently died (P = 0.04).

Conclusions The routine injection of cattle with vitamins A, D and E at feedlot entry is unlikely to result in improvements in health and growth rate where cattle are provided with these vitamins in their diets at concentrations equal to the National Research Council recommendations. Mortality rate in cattle diagnosed with BRD may be reduced by intramuscular injection of vitamin C at the time of treatment with antibiotics.

Keyword Cattle
feedlots
Antioxidant Vitamins
bovine respiratory disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Sat, 21 Mar 2009, 00:03:43 EST by Narelle Poole on behalf of School of Veterinary Science