Infant cortisol response after prolonged antenatal prednisolone treatment

Miller, N. M., Williamson, C., Fisk, N. M. and Glover, V. (2004) Infant cortisol response after prolonged antenatal prednisolone treatment. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 111 12: 1471-1474. doi:10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00288.x


Author Miller, N. M.
Williamson, C.
Fisk, N. M.
Glover, V.
Title Infant cortisol response after prolonged antenatal prednisolone treatment
Journal name BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-5456
0140-7686
1471-0528
Publication date 2004-12-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00288.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 111
Issue 12
Start page 1471
End page 1474
Total pages 4
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 111402 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Abstract Prednisolone is widely used to treat medical conditions in pregnancy, despite the lack of long term safety studies on infants. Animal studies have shown that antenatal glucocorticoid treatment can cause in utero growth restriction and up-regulation of the offsprings' hypathalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We recruited women treated antenatally with prednisolone, and followed 12 of the infants up to four months. using routine infant vaccinations as a stressor. Birthweights were similar to controls (n=289, uncomplicated, singleton term pregnancies), as were infants' baseline and stress-induced cortisol levels. Mothers rated their infants as less difficult and more adaptable than controls. This study provides initial reassurance about the safety of prednisolone in pregnancy.
Formatted abstract
Prednisolone is widely used to treat medical conditions in pregnancy, despite the lack of long term safety studies on infants. Animal studies have shown that antenatal glucocorticoid treatment can cause in utero growth restriction and up-regulation of the offsprings' hypathalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. We recruited women treated antenatally with prednisolone, and followed 12 of the infants up to four months, using routine infant vaccinations as a stressor. Birthweights were similar to controls (n= 289, uncomplicated, singleton term pregnancies), as were infants' baseline and stress-induced cortisol levels. Mothers rated their infants as less difficult and more adaptable than controls. This study provides initial reassurance about the safety of prednisolone in pregnancy.
©RCOG 2004 BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Keyword Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment
Prednisolone
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 23:22:41 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences