School-based interventions for spinal pain: a systematic review

Steele, E., Dawson, A. and Hiller, J. (2006) School-based interventions for spinal pain: a systematic review. Spine, 31 2: 226-233. doi:10.1097/01.brs.0000195158.00680.0d


Author Steele, E.
Dawson, A.
Hiller, J.
Title School-based interventions for spinal pain: a systematic review
Journal name Spine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0362-2436
Publication date 2006-01-15
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1097/01.brs.0000195158.00680.0d
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 2
Start page 226
End page 233
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia
Publisher Hanley & Belfus
Language eng
Subject 111712 Health Promotion
111716 Preventive Medicine
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
Abstract Study Design. Systematic review. Objectives. To establish the effectiveness of school-based spinal health interventions in terms of: 1) improving knowledge about the spine/spinal care; 2) changing spinal care behaviors; and 3) decreasing the prevalence of spinal pain. Summary of Background Data. Spinal pain is a significant problem in children and adolescents that has been addressed through school-based spinal health interventions. No systematic review has been carried out on this topic to date. Methods. A systematic literature review sought studies that evaluated school-based spinal health interventions. Using clearly defined study inclusion criteria, 11 databases were searched from their inception to March 2004. To identify further literature, three relevant journals were hand searched, reference lists were checked, and authors of included papers were contacted. Two reviewers independently appraised the quality of identified papers and extracted data regarding intervention and study characteristics, statistical analyses performed, and study results. Data were examined using a narrative synthesis of results, and the outcomes of interest were considered individually (knowledge, behaviors, pain prevalence). Results. Twelve papers were included in this review; all papers received a weak quality rating. Results of these studies indicate that school-based spinal health interventions may be effective in increasing spinal care knowledge and decreasing the prevalence of spinal pain. However, overall the evidence is inconclusive regarding spinal care behaviors. Conclusions. The poor quality of the reviewed studies limits the conclusions that can be made regarding the effectiveness of school-based spinal health interventions.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 22:30:22 EST by Ms Sarada Rao on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences