Microchimerism in female bone marrow and bone decades after fetal mesenchymal stem-cell trafficking in pregnancy

O'Donoghue, Keelin, Chan, Jerry, de la Fuente, Josu, Kennea, Nigel, Sandison, Ann, Anderson, Jonathan R., Roberts, Irene A. G. and Fisk, Nicholas M. (2004) Microchimerism in female bone marrow and bone decades after fetal mesenchymal stem-cell trafficking in pregnancy. Lancet, 364 9429: 179-182. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16631-2


Author O'Donoghue, Keelin
Chan, Jerry
de la Fuente, Josu
Kennea, Nigel
Sandison, Ann
Anderson, Jonathan R.
Roberts, Irene A. G.
Fisk, Nicholas M.
Title Microchimerism in female bone marrow and bone decades after fetal mesenchymal stem-cell trafficking in pregnancy
Journal name Lancet   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 140-6736; 1474-547X; 0099-5355; 1470-2045
Publication date 2004-07-10
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(04)16631-2
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 364
Issue 9429
Start page 179
End page 182
Total pages 4
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Lancet Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 111401 Foetal Development and Medicine
111402 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract Fetal cells enter maternal blood during pregnancy and persist in women with autoimmune disease. The frequency of subsequent fetomaternal microchimerism in healthy women and its cell type is unknown. To test the hypothesis that fetal mesenchymal stem cells persist in maternal organs, we studied female bone marrow and ribs. Male cells were identified by XY fluorescence in-situ hybridisation in marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and in rib sections from all women with male pregnancies, but not in controls (9/9 vs 0/5, p=0.0005). We conclude that fetal stem cells transfer-red into maternal blood engraft in marrow, where they remain throughout life. This finding has implications for normal pregnancy, for obstetric complications that increase fetomaternal trafficking, and for graft survival after transplantation.
Formatted abstract
Fetal cells enter maternal blood during pregnancy and persist in women with autoimmune disease. The frequency of subsequent fetomaternal microchimerism in healthy women and its cell type is unknown. To test the hypothesis that fetal mesenchymal stem cells persist in maternal organs, we studied female bone marrow and ribs. Male cells were identified by XY fluorescence in-situ hybridisation in marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and in rib sections from all women with male pregnancies, but not in controls (9/9 vs 0/5, p=0·0005). We conclude that fetal stem cells transferred into maternal blood engraft in marrow, where they remain throughout life. This finding has implications for normal pregnancy, for obstetric complications that increase fetomaternal trafficking, and for graft survival after transplantation.
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

Keyword Fetomaternal microchimerism
Fetal mesenchymal stem cells
Fetomaternal trafficking
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Article published under Research Letters

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 21:42:10 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences