UK health inequalities: The class system is alive and well

Heller, R., Weller, D. and Jamrozik, K. (2004) UK health inequalities: The class system is alive and well. Medical Journal of Australia, 181 3: 128-128.


Author Heller, R.
Weller, D.
Jamrozik, K.
Title UK health inequalities: The class system is alive and well
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 2004-08-01
Sub-type Discussion - responses, round table/panel discussions, Q&A, reply
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 181
Issue 3
Start page 128
End page 128
Total pages 1
Place of publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract In the United Kingdom today, the widening gap between upper and lower “social classes” is regularly presented by politicians and health bureaucrats to professional and lay audiences alike, and used to justify the public health agenda. Health inequalities have become the driving force for public health initiatives. The government under Thatcher explored “variations” in health outcomes and in health service provision. Subsequently, the Blair government replaced “variations” with the more class-oriented “inequalities”. All too often, however, attempts to deal with the real and frequently demonstrated social gradient in disease and in health service provision is limited to “hand-wringing epidemiology”. In any case, discussion of a widening gap reflects a failure to understand the difference between relative and absolute risk, as well as demographic change and the type of outcomes amenable to prevention.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Discussion - responses, round table/panel discussions, Q&A, reply
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 20:11:20 EST by Paul Rollo on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences