Mental ill-health and the differential effect of employee type on absenteeism and presenteeism

Hilton, Michael F., Scuffham, Paul A., Sheridan, Judith, Cleary, Catherine M. and Whiteford, Harvey A. (2008) Mental ill-health and the differential effect of employee type on absenteeism and presenteeism. Journal of Occupational Environmental Medicine, 50 11: 1228-1243. doi:10.1097/JOM.0b013e31818c30a8


Author Hilton, Michael F.
Scuffham, Paul A.
Sheridan, Judith
Cleary, Catherine M.
Whiteford, Harvey A.
Title Mental ill-health and the differential effect of employee type on absenteeism and presenteeism
Journal name Journal of Occupational Environmental Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1076-2752
Publication date 2008-11-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31818c30a8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 50
Issue 11
Start page 1228
End page 1243
Total pages 16
Editor Paul W. Brand-Rauf
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 321204 Mental Health
C1
920209 Mental Health Services
111714 Mental Health
Abstract Objective: Mental ill-health results in substantial reductions in employee productivity (absenteeism and presenteeism). This paper examines the relationship between employee psychological distress, employee type and productivity. Method: Utilizing the Health and Performance at Work Questionnaire, in a sample of 60,556 full-time employes, the impzact that psychological distress (Kessler 6) imposes on employee productivity by occupation type is examined. Results: Comparison of white-collar workers absenteeism rates by low and high psychological distress reveals no statistically significant difference, Neverthless, the same comparison for blue-collar workers reveals that high psychological distress results in an 18% increase in absenteeism rates. High K6 score resulted in a presenteeism increase of 6% in both blue and white-collar employees. Conclusion: The novel finding is that mental ill-health produces little to no absenteeism in white-collar workers yet a profound absenteeism increase in the blue-collar sector. (J Occup Environ Med. 2008;50:1228-1243)
Formatted abstract
Objective:
Mental ill-health results in substantial reductions in employee productivity (absenteeism and presenteeism). This paper examines the relationship between employee psychological distress, employee type and productivity.

Method:
Utilizing the Health and Performance at Work Questionnaire, in a sample of 60,556 full-time employes, the impzact that psychological distress (Kessler 6) imposes on employee productivity by occupation type is examined.

Results:
Comparison of white-collar workers absenteeism rates by low and high psychological distress reveals no statistically significant difference, Neverthless, the same comparison for blue-collar workers reveals that high psychological distress results in an 18% increase in absenteeism rates. High K6 score resulted in a presenteeism increase of 6% in both blue and white-collar employees.

Conclusion:
The novel finding is that mental ill-health produces little to no absenteeism in white-collar workers yet a profound absenteeism increase in the blue-collar sector. (J Occup Environ Med. 2008;50:1228-1243)
Keyword National-comorbidity-survey
Performance questionnaire HPQ
Chronic medical conditions
Major Depressive Disorder
General-population
Work performance
psychological distress
Psychiatric-disorders
Economic burden
Organization health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 37 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 39 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 20:08:53 EST by Carmel Meir on behalf of School of Public Health