Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to cutaneous electrical stimulation after fentanyl in the ovine fetus

Smith, Richard P., Miller, Suzanne L., Igosheva, Natalia, Peebles, Donald M., Glover, Vivette, Jenkin, Graham, Hanson, Mark A. and Fisk, Nicholas M. (2004) Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to cutaneous electrical stimulation after fentanyl in the ovine fetus. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 190 3: 836-842. doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2003.09.064


Author Smith, Richard P.
Miller, Suzanne L.
Igosheva, Natalia
Peebles, Donald M.
Glover, Vivette
Jenkin, Graham
Hanson, Mark A.
Fisk, Nicholas M.
Title Cardiovascular and endocrine responses to cutaneous electrical stimulation after fentanyl in the ovine fetus
Journal name American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9378
1097-6868
Publication date 2004-03-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2003.09.064
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 190
Issue 3
Start page 836
End page 842
Total pages 7
Place of publication St Louis, MO, U.S.A.
Publisher Mosby
Language eng
Subject 111402 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether physical stimulation is stressful to the ovine fetus, as judged from physiologic changes that are similar to those reported for other stressors (such as hypoxia); whether any stress response could be blocked by clinically used doses of fentanyl; and whether fentanyl alone had any potentially deleterious physiologic effects in the fetus.
Formatted abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether physical stimulation is stressful to the ovine fetus, as judged from physiologic changes that are similar to those reported for other stressors (such as hypoxia); whether any stress response could be blocked by clinically used doses of fentanyl; and whether fentanyl alone had any potentially deleterious physiologic effects in the fetus.
Study design: We investigated the effect of fentanyl analgesia on the cardiovascular and endocrine response to cutaneous electrical stimulation in the late gestation (>125 days) ovine fetus (n = 7 fetuses). Chronically implanted catheters and blood flow probes were used to measure fetal arterial blood pressure, heart rate, carotid and femoral blood flow, pH, Po2, Pco2, lactate, cortisol, and β-endorphin levels before, during, and for 1 hour after 5 minutes of cutaneous electrical stimulation to the lip, forelimb, and abdomen, in a crossover design. Clinically used 30 or 150 μg doses of fentanyl (which approximated 10 or 50 μg/kg estimated fetal weight) or saline solution were given intravenously to the fetus 2 minutes before stimulation.
Results: When compared with the control, stimulation caused a significant rise in fetal heart rate (P = .003; mean maximal rise, 48.6±14.0 beats/min, 0-10 minutes after the start of stimulation) but caused no change in any other parameters studied. Neither dose of fentanyl attenuated the changes in heart rate that were observed in response to stimulation alone. Fentanyl alone significantly increased fetal heart rate, carotid blood flow, and lactate and cortisol levels and significantly decreased pH and Po2.
Conclusion: Cutaneous electrical stimulation in the fetal sheep causes an increase in heart rate, which fentanyl does not block. Fentanyl itself has significant effects on the cardiovascular and endocrine system, which might adversely affect the fetus.
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keyword Sheep
Opioid
Analgesia
Electric stimulation
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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