Temporal and geographical variation in UK obstetricians’ personal preference regarding mode of delivery

Groom, Katie M., Paterson-Brown, Sara and Fisk, Nicholas M. (2002) Temporal and geographical variation in UK obstetricians’ personal preference regarding mode of delivery. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, 100 2: 185-188. doi:10.1016/S0301-2115(01)00468-7


Author Groom, Katie M.
Paterson-Brown, Sara
Fisk, Nicholas M.
Title Temporal and geographical variation in UK obstetricians’ personal preference regarding mode of delivery
Journal name European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-2115
1872-7654
0921-8750
1576-7965
Publication date 2002-01-10
Year available 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0301-2115(01)00468-7
Open Access Status
Volume 100
Issue 2
Start page 185
End page 188
Total pages 4
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 111402 Obstetrics and Gynaecology
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Abstract Objective: To assess UK obstetricians' preferences about mode of delivery for themselves or their partners and determine whether these changed since 1995. Study Design: All 313 registered obstetricians in London and one in five (279) sample of those outside London were sent a structured anonymous postal questionnaire. Results: The response rate was 54%. In a hypothetical uncomplicated first singleton pregnancy with a cephalic presentation at term, 15% chose elective caesarean section (CS) (17% in London versus 13% outside London). The overall rate for London has not changed since 1995 (17 versus 17%), although the difference between women and men was less (31 versus 8% in 1995 and 21 versus 14% in 1999, respectively). The number choosing elective CS increased with estimated foetal weight >4.0 kg (40%) and >4.5 kg (65%) and with breech presentation both in a first pregnancy (69%) and after a previous vaginal delivery (49%). Conclusion: The overall attitude of London obstetricians to mode of delivery for themselves or their partners has not changed since 1995 and is similar to those of UK obstetricians elsewhere. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To assess UK obstetricians’ preferences about mode of delivery for themselves or their partners and determine whether these changed since 1995.
Study Design: All 313 registered obstetricians in London and one in five (279) sample of those outside London were sent a structured anonymous postal questionnaire.
Results: The response rate was 54%. In a hypothetical uncomplicated first singleton pregnancy with a cephalic presentation at term, 15% chose elective caesarean section (CS) (17% in London versus 13% outside London). The overall rate for London has not changed since 1995 (17 versus 17%), although the difference between women and men was less (31 versus 8% in 1995 and 21 versus 14% in 1999, respectively). The number choosing elective CS increased with estimated foetal weight >4.0 kg (40%) and >4.5 kg (65%) and with breech presentation both in a first pregnancy (69%) and after a previous vaginal delivery (49%).
Conclusion: The overall attitude of London obstetricians to mode of delivery for themselves or their partners has not changed since 1995 and is similar to those of UK obstetricians elsewhere.
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keyword UK obstetricians
Mode of delivery
Caesarean section
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 25 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 20 Mar 2009, 00:16:19 EST by Maria Campbell on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences