Appropriateness of red blood cell transfusion in Australasian intensive care practice

French, Craig J., Bellomo, Rinaldo, Finfer, Simon R., Lipman, Jeffery, Chapman, Marianne, Boyce, Neil W. and ANZICS Clinical Trials Group (2002) Appropriateness of red blood cell transfusion in Australasian intensive care practice. Medical Journal Australia, 177 10: 548-551.


Author French, Craig J.
Bellomo, Rinaldo
Finfer, Simon R.
Lipman, Jeffery
Chapman, Marianne
Boyce, Neil W.
ANZICS Clinical Trials Group
Title Appropriateness of red blood cell transfusion in Australasian intensive care practice
Journal name Medical Journal Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 2002-11-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 177
Issue 10
Start page 548
End page 551
Total pages 4
Place of publication Sydney
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Co.
Language eng
Subject 110202 Haematology
110310 Intensive Care
Abstract Objective: To determine the incidence and appropriateness of use of allogenic packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in Australian and New Zealand intensive care practice. Setting:Intensive care units of 18 Australian and New Zealand hospitals: March 2001. Design: Prospective, observational, multicentre study. Methods: All admissions to participating intensive care units were screened and all patients who received a transfusion of RBC were enrolled. The indications for transfusion were recorded and compared with Australian National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines. Transfusions conforming to these guidelines were deemed appropriate. Main outcome measures: RBC transfusion in intensive care and transfusion appropriateness. Results: 1808 admissions to intensive care units were screened: 357 (19.8%) admissions (350 patients) received an RBC transfusion while in intensive care. Overall, 1464 RBC units were administered in intensive care on 576 transfusion days. The most common indications for transfusion were acute bleeding (60.1%; 880/1464) and diminished physiological reserve (28.9%; 423/1464). The rate of inappropriate transfusion was 3.0% (44/1464). Diminished physiological reserve with haemogloblin level ≥ 100 g/L was the indication in 50% (22/44) of inappropriate transfusions; no indication was provided for 31% (15/44). Conclusion: The rate of inappropriate transfusion in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units in 2001 was remarkably low. Transfusion of allogenic packed red blood cells (RBC) is common in intensive care units (ICU), but prospective epide
Keyword Medicine - Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 22:28:28 EST by Ms Karen Naughton on behalf of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care - RBWH