Turning objects on their heads: The influence of the stored axis on object individuation

Harris, Irina M. and Dux, Paul E. (2005) Turning objects on their heads: The influence of the stored axis on object individuation. Perception and Psychophysics, 67 6: 1010-1015. doi:10.3758/BF03193627


Author Harris, Irina M.
Dux, Paul E.
Title Turning objects on their heads: The influence of the stored axis on object individuation
Journal name Perception and Psychophysics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-5117
1943-393X
Publication date 2005-08-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/BF03193627
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 67
Issue 6
Start page 1010
End page 1015
Total pages 6
Place of publication Austin, TX, U.S.A.
Publisher Psychonomic Society
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
Abstract We used repetition blindness (RB) as a measure of object recognition and compared the pattern of RB obtained for objects with a well-established upright orientation (mono-oriented objects) and those without a usual upright orientation (polyoriented objects), when the critical objects were either in identical orientations or differed by 3 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, or 180 degrees. Overall, we found robust RB despite differences in orientation, consistent with the idea that object recognition, as indexed by RB, is largely independent of orientation. However, whereas for polyoriented objects RB was obtained in all orientation conditions, for mono-oriented objects there was no RB between upright and upside-down versions of the stimuli. These findings suggest that the usual orientation of an object-when it exists-is stored in memory and can facilitate orientation processing when the principal axis of a viewed object is aligned with the stored axis orientation. This, in turn, allows for more rapid and successful construction of distinct episodic representations of an object, thus alleviating RB.
Formatted abstract
We used repetition blindness (RB) as a measure of object recognition and compared the pattern of RB obtained for objects with a well-established upright orientation (mono-oriented objects) and those without a usual upright orientation (polyoriented objects), when the critical objects were either in identical orientations or differed by 30°, 60°, 90°, or 180°. Overall, we found robust RB despite differences in orientation, consistent with the idea that object recognition, as indexed by RB, is largely independent of orientation. However, whereas for polyoriented objects RB was obtained in all orientation conditions, for mono-oriented objects there was no RB between upright and upside-down versions of the stimuli. These findings suggest that the usual orientation of an object - when it exists - is stored in memory and can facilitate orientation processing when the principal axis of a viewed object is aligned with the stored axis orientation. This, in turn, allows for more rapid and successful construction of distinct episodic representations of an object, thus alleviating RB.
Copyright 2005 Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Keyword Repetition blindness
Orientation
Recognition
Pictures
Agnosia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 22:03:34 EST by Jason Parr on behalf of School of Psychology