Spatial gradient for unique-feature detection in patients with unilateral neglect: Evidence from auditory and visual search

Eramudugolla, Ranmalee and Mattingley, Jason B. (2009) Spatial gradient for unique-feature detection in patients with unilateral neglect: Evidence from auditory and visual search. Neurocase, 15 1: 24-31. doi:10.1080/13554790802570472


Author Eramudugolla, Ranmalee
Mattingley, Jason B.
Title Spatial gradient for unique-feature detection in patients with unilateral neglect: Evidence from auditory and visual search
Journal name Neurocase   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 135564794: 1465-3656
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13554790802570472
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 24
End page 31
Total pages 8
Editor Bruce L. Miller
Blanch H. Coslett
H. J. Markowitsch
Ian H. Robertson
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Language eng
Subject C1
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Patients with unilateral spatial neglect following right hemisphere damage are impaired in detecting contralesional targets in both visual and haptic search tasks, and often show a graded improvement in detection performance for more ipsilesional spatial locations. In audition, multiple simultaneous sounds are most effectively perceived if they are distributed along the frequency dimension. Thus, attention to spectro-temporal features alone can allow detection of a target sound amongst multiple simultaneous distracter sounds, regardless of whether these sounds are spatially separated. Spatial bias in attention associated with neglect should not affect auditory search based on spectro-temporal features of a sound target. We report that a right brain damaged patient with neglect demonstrated a significant gradient favouring the ipsilesional side on a visual search task as well as an auditory search task in which the target was a frequency modulated tone amongst steady distractor tones. No such asymmetry was apparent in the auditory search performance of a control patient with a right hemisphere lesion but no neglect. The results suggest that the spatial bias in attention exhibited by neglect patients affects stimulus processing even when spatial information is irrelevant to the task.
Keyword Spatial neglect
Auditory perception
Search
Head-related transfer function
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 20:46:50 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute