Feasibility of functional magnetic resonance lung imaging in Australia with long distance transport of hyperpolarized helium from Germany

Thien, Francis, Friese, Marlies, Cowin, Gary, Maillet, Donald, Wang, Deming, Galloway, Graham, Brereton, Ian, Robinson, Philip J., Heil, Werner and Thompson, Bruce (2008) Feasibility of functional magnetic resonance lung imaging in Australia with long distance transport of hyperpolarized helium from Germany. Respirology, 13 4: 599-602. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1843.2008.01262.x


Author Thien, Francis
Friese, Marlies
Cowin, Gary
Maillet, Donald
Wang, Deming
Galloway, Graham
Brereton, Ian
Robinson, Philip J.
Heil, Werner
Thompson, Bruce
Title Feasibility of functional magnetic resonance lung imaging in Australia with long distance transport of hyperpolarized helium from Germany
Journal name Respirology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-7799
Publication date 2008-06-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2008.01262.x
Open Access Status
Volume 13
Issue 4
Start page 599
End page 602
Total pages 4
Editor P. J. Thompson
Place of publication Carlton, Vic., Australia
Publisher Blackwell Science
Language eng
Subject C1
110320 Radiology and Organ Imaging
920115 Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma)
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
Abstract Background and objective: MRI of the lung using hyperpolarized helium as an inhaled contrast agent has important research applications and clinical potential. Owing to the limited availability of hyperpolarized helium, this type of imaging has not been performed in the human lung outside of North America or Europe. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of imaging human lungs in Australia using hyperpolarized helium gas imported from Germany.
Formatted abstract
Background and objective: MRI of the lung using hyperpolarized helium as an inhaled contrast agent has important research applications and clinical potential. Owing to the limited availability of hyperpolarized helium, this type of imaging has not been performed in the human lung outside of North America or Europe. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of imaging human lungs in Australia using hyperpolarized helium gas imported from Germany.

Methods: A Bruker 2-Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance scanner located in Brisbane, Australia was adapted with a helium-3 radiofrequency transceiver coil. Helium-3 was hyperpolarized to 72% in Mainz, Germany and airfreighted to Brisbane. The time taken for the journey was 32 h and scanning was performed 36–40 h after departure from Mainz, with an estimated polarization level of 44%. Procedures were developed to transfer 300 mL of the hyperpolarized helium to Tedlar bags filled with 700 mL of nitrogen. Healthy volunteers inhaled the 1 L helium/nitrogen mixture from FRC, and imaging was performed with a 10 s breathhold.

Results: Imaging showed very detailed and even ventilation of all regions of the lung with a good signal-to-noise ratio. No adverse effects of inhaling the gas mixture were noted.

Conclusions: This report of MRI of the human lung using hyperpolarized helium demonstrates the feasibility of long distance gas transport from Germany to Australia. This will help to facilitate research and clinical application of this innovative functional lung imaging technique.
Keyword Gas transport
Hyperpolarized helium
Magnetic resonance lung imaging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 12 Mar 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Mar 2009, 01:26:24 EST by Lesley-Jayne Jerrard on behalf of Faculty of Science