Cystic echinococcosis in a wild population of the brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata), a threatened macropodid

Barnes, Tamsin, Goldizen, Anne W., Morton, John M. and Coleman, Glen T. (2008) Cystic echinococcosis in a wild population of the brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata), a threatened macropodid. Parasitology, 135 6: 715-723. doi:10.1017/S0031182008004423


Author Barnes, Tamsin
Goldizen, Anne W.
Morton, John M.
Coleman, Glen T.
Title Cystic echinococcosis in a wild population of the brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata), a threatened macropodid
Journal name Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-1820
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0031182008004423
Volume 135
Issue 6
Start page 715
End page 723
Total pages 9
Editor C. Arme
R. S. Phillips
Place of publication UK
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
070708 Veterinary Parasitology
970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Abstract Infection of small macropodids with the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus can cause fatalities as well as significant pulmonary impairment and other adverse sequelae. The brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) is a small macropodid listed as vulnerable on the IUCN's Red List of Threatened Species. This study used radiographic techniques to determine the prevalence and severity of pulmonary hydatid infection and growth rates of hydatid cysts in a wild population of this macropodid. The overall prevalence was 15·3% (9/59 animals) with 20·0% (8/40 animals) of adults infected. During the study period, the death of at least 1 infected animal was directly attributed to pulmonary hydatidosis. Rapid cyst growth occurred in some animals (up to 43% increase in cyst volume in 3 months). Cyst volume reduced lung capacity by up to 17%. Secondary pulmonary changes were uncommon but, in 1 animal, resulted in reduction in lung capacity by approximately 50%. Infection was associated with a higher blood urea concentration, but no significant differences in other blood variables were detected. These results indicate that hydatid infection may be a significant risk to threatened populations of small macropodids and should be addressed in conservation management plans for these animals.
Keyword Echinococcus granulosus
hydatid
marsupial
macropodid
brush-tailed rock wallaby
Petrogale penicillata
conservation
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 18 Mar 2009, 20:49:30 EST by Narelle Poole on behalf of School of Veterinary Science