Sticking to our guns: social identity as a basis for the maintenance of commitment to faltering organizational projects

Haslam, S. Alexander, Ryan, Michelle K., Postmes,Tom, Spears, Russell, Jetten, Jolanda and Paul Webley (2006) Sticking to our guns: social identity as a basis for the maintenance of commitment to faltering organizational projects. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 27 6: 607-628. doi:10.1002/job.370

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Author Haslam, S. Alexander
Ryan, Michelle K.
Postmes,Tom
Spears, Russell
Jetten, Jolanda
Paul Webley
Title Sticking to our guns: social identity as a basis for the maintenance of commitment to faltering organizational projects
Journal name Journal of Organizational Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-1379
0894-3796
Publication date 2006-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/job.370
Open Access Status
Volume 27
Issue 6
Start page 607
End page 628
Total pages 22
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publisher Wiley
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
Abstract What leads some people to maintain commitment to faltering organizational projects while others abandon them? Building on previous work that has examined the link between social identity and the characteristics of decision-making associated with groupthink, this paper argues that one key determinant of continued commitment to group projects is the extent to which group members define themselves in terms of a shared social identity rather than as individuals. This hypothesis is tested in two experiments that manipulate social identity salience and monitor attitudinal and financial commitment to an organizational project that encounters increasing difficulties over time. As predicted, in both studies, experimentally induced social identification leads to sustained commitment to the project across three temporal phases, while individuation of participants leads to a loss of faith and reduced financial commitment. These results contribute to theoretical understanding of the important role played by social identity in unfolding patterns of organizational and team commitment. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 48 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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