Impact of Vitamin A on Selected Gastrointestinal Pathogen Infections and Associated Diarrheal Episodes among Children in Mexico City, Mexico

Long, Kurt Z., Santos, Jose Ignacio, Rosado, Jorge L., Lopez‐Saucedo, Catalina, Thompson‐Bonilla, Rocio, Abonce, Maricela, DuPont, Herbert L., Hertzmark, Ellen and Estrada‐Garcia, Teresa (2006) Impact of Vitamin A on Selected Gastrointestinal Pathogen Infections and Associated Diarrheal Episodes among Children in Mexico City, Mexico. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 194 9: 1217-1225. doi:10.1086/508292


Author Long, Kurt Z.
Santos, Jose Ignacio
Rosado, Jorge L.
Lopez‐Saucedo, Catalina
Thompson‐Bonilla, Rocio
Abonce, Maricela
DuPont, Herbert L.
Hertzmark, Ellen
Estrada‐Garcia, Teresa
Title Impact of Vitamin A on Selected Gastrointestinal Pathogen Infections and Associated Diarrheal Episodes among Children in Mexico City, Mexico
Journal name Journal of Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1899
Publication date 2006-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/508292
Volume 194
Issue 9
Start page 1217
End page 1225
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chicago
Publisher The University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background The overall effect of vitamin A supplementation on diarrheal disease in community trials may result from its effect on specific diarrheal pathogens.
Methods We conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of the prophylactic effect of vitamin A on gastrointestinal pathogen infections and clinical symptoms among 188 children in Mexico City, Mexico, from January 1998 to May 1999. Children 6–15 months of age were randomly assigned to receive either a vitamin A supplement (for children <12 months of age, 20,000 international units [IU] of retinol; for children ≥12 months of age, 45,000 IU of retinol) every 2 months or a placebo and were followed for up to 15 months. Stool samples, collected semimonthly, were screened for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), Shiga toxin–producing E. coli (STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and Giardia lamblia.
Results Vitamin A supplementation reduced the prevalence of EPEC infections (rate ratio [RR], 0.52 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.23–0.86]) and led to shorter durations of both EPEC and ETEC infections. Supplementation also reduced the prevalence of EPEC-associated diarrhea (RR, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.16–1.00]), EPEC-associated fever (RR, 0.15 [95% CI, 0.02–0.98]), and G. lamblia–associated fever (RR, 0.27 [95% CI, 0.13–0.80]). Finally, children who received vitamin A supplementation had shorter durations of EPEC-associated diarrhea than did children who did not receive supplementation but had longer durations of G. lamblia–associated diarrhea.
Conclusions These results suggest that the effect of vitamin A supplementation on clinical outcomes may be pathogen dependent.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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