Fear Conditioning and Long-term Potentiation in the Amygdala What Really Is the Connection?

Sah, Pankaj, Westbrook, R. F. and Luthi, A. (2008) Fear Conditioning and Long-term Potentiation in the Amygdala What Really Is the Connection?. Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 1129 88-95. doi:10.1196/annals.1417.020


Author Sah, Pankaj
Westbrook, R. F.
Luthi, A.
Title Fear Conditioning and Long-term Potentiation in the Amygdala What Really Is the Connection?
Journal name Annals of the New York Academy of Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0077-8923
1749-6632
Publication date 2008-06-28
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1196/annals.1417.020
Open Access Status
Volume 1129
Start page 88
End page 95
Total pages 8
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley- Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
920111 Nervous System and Disorders
1109 Neurosciences
Abstract The cellular mechanisms that underlie learning and memory formation remain one of the most intriguing unknowns about the mammalian brain. A plethora of experimental evidence over the last 30 years has established that long-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory synapses is the most likely mechanism that underlies learning and memory formation. Experiments done largely in acute brain slices maintained in vitro have revealed many of the molecular mechanisms in the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). However, evidence directly liking LTP with learning and memory formation has not been established. Pavlovian fear conditioning is a good candidate to provide such evidence. The relations between events that produce fear conditioning are simple; these relations and their fear products involve circuits in the amygdala that are well understood, as are those circuits in the amygdala that underlie LTP. The evidence that links LTP in the amygdala with fear conditioning is reviewed.
Keyword Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 71 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 11 Mar 2009, 22:12:02 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute