Breast cancer stem cells: Implications for therapy of breast cancer

Morrison, Brian J., Schmidt, Chis W., Lakhani, Sunil, Reynolds, Brent A. and Alejandro, Lopez J. (2008) Breast cancer stem cells: Implications for therapy of breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research, 10 4: 210-1-210-14. doi:10.1186/bcr2111


Author Morrison, Brian J.
Schmidt, Chis W.
Lakhani, Sunil
Reynolds, Brent A.
Alejandro, Lopez J.
Title Breast cancer stem cells: Implications for therapy of breast cancer
Journal name Breast Cancer Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1465-542X
1465-5411
Publication date 2008-07-22
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/bcr2111
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 4
Start page 210-1
End page 210-14
Total pages 14
Editor Lewis A. Chodosh
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Abstract The concept of cancer stem cells responsible for tumour origin, maintenance, and resistance to treatment has gained prominence in the field of breast cancer research. The therapeutic targeting of these cells has the potential to eliminate residual disease and may become an important component of a multimodality treatment. Recent improvements in immunotherapy targeting of tumourassociated antigens have advanced the prospect of targeting breast cancer stem cells, an approach that might lead to more meaningful clinical remissions. Here, we review the role of stem cells in the healthy breast, the role of breast cancer stem cells in disease, and the potential to target these cells. Published: 22 July 2008 © 2008 BioMed Central Ltd
Keyword Oncology
Oncology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 07 Mar 2009, 02:39:59 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute