Responses of North American Papilio troilus and P. glaucus to potential hosts from Australia

Scriber, J. Mark, Larsen, Michelle L. and Zalucki, Myron P. (2008) Responses of North American Papilio troilus and P. glaucus to potential hosts from Australia. The Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society, 62 1: 18-30.


Author Scriber, J. Mark
Larsen, Michelle L.
Zalucki, Myron P.
Title Responses of North American Papilio troilus and P. glaucus to potential hosts from Australia
Formatted title
Responses of North American Papilio troilus and P. glaucus to potential hosts from Australia

Journal name The Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0024-0966
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 62
Issue 1
Start page 18
End page 30
Total pages 13
Place of publication Los Angeles, CA, USA
Publisher The Lepidopterists' Society
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060303 Biological Adaptation
Abstract We tested the abilities of neonate larvae of the Lauraceae-specialist, P. troilus, and the generalist Eastern tiger swallow-tail, Papilio glaucus (both from Levy County, Florida) to eat, survive, and grow on leaves of 22 plant species from 7 families of ancient angiosperms in Australia, Rutaceae, Magnoliaceae, Lauraceae, Monimiaceae, Sapotaceae, Winteraceae, and Annonaceae. Clearly, some common Papilio feeding stimulants exist in Australian plant species of certain, but not all, Lauraceae. Three Lauraceae species (two introduced Cinnamomum species and the native Litsea leefeana) were as suitable for the generalist F. glaucus as was observed for F. troilus. While no ability to feed and grow was detected for the Lauraceae-specialized P. troilus on any of the other six ancient Angiosperm families, the generalist R. glaucus did feed successfully on Magnoliaceae and Winteraceae as well as Lauraceae. In addition, some larvae of one R. glaucus family attempted feeding on Citrus (Rutaceae) and a small amount of feeding was observed on southern sassafras (Antherosperma moschatum; Monimiaceae), but all P. glaucus (from 4 families) died on Annonaceae and Sapotaceae. Surprisingly, the North American Lauraceae-specialist (P. troilus) died on all Lauraceae species by day #12, but some generalist P. glaucus larvae survived. Most of the generalist (P. glaucus) offspring survived and grew very well on all 3 species of Magnoliaceae assayed (Magnolia virginiana, Michelia champaca, & Michelia doltsopa) and on Tasmannia insipida (Winteraceae). The ability of these larvae to feed and grow on T. insipida but not T. lanceolata suggests significant phytochemical differences may exist within the Winteraceae. Two Monimiaceae "sassafras" plant species were unsuitable to both North American Papilio species despite their very close phylogenetic relationship with the Lauraceae.
Keyword Annonaceae
detoxification
Lauraceae
Magnoliaceae
Monimiaceae
neonate survival
Papilionidae
Rutaceae
Winteraceae
P. glaucus
P. troilus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 05 Mar 2009, 23:10:12 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences