Thermal Plasticity of Diving Behavior, Aquatic Respiration, and Locomotor Performance in the Mary River Turtle Elusor macrurus

Clarke,N., Gordos, M. A. and Franklin, C. E. (2008) Thermal Plasticity of Diving Behavior, Aquatic Respiration, and Locomotor Performance in the Mary River Turtle Elusor macrurus. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 81 3: 301-309. doi:10.1086/528779

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Author Clarke,N.
Gordos, M. A.
Franklin, C. E.
Title Thermal Plasticity of Diving Behavior, Aquatic Respiration, and Locomotor Performance in the Mary River Turtle Elusor macrurus
Formatted title
Thermal Plasticity of Diving Behavior, Aquatic Respiration, and Locomotor Performance in the Mary River Turtle Elusor macrurus
Journal name Physiological and Biochemical Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1522-2152
1537-5293
Publication date 2008-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/528779
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 81
Issue 3
Start page 301
End page 309
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chicago, IL United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Subject C1
960807 Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
0606 Physiology
0608 Zoology
Formatted abstract
Locomotion is a common measure of performance used in studies of thermal acclimation because of its correlation with predator escape and prey capture. However, for sedentary animals such as freshwater turtles, we propose that diving behavior may be a more ecologically relevant measure of performance. Increasing dive duration in hatchling turtles reduces predator exposure and therefore functions as an ecological benefit. Diving behavior is thermally dependent, and in some species of freshwater turtles, it is also reliant on aquatic respiration. This study examined the influence of thermal acclimation on diving behavior, aquatic respiration, and locomotor performance in the endangered, bimodally respiring Mary River turtle Elusor macrurus. Diving behavior was found to partially acclimate at 17°C, with turtles acclimated to a cold temperature (17°C) having a significantly longer dive duration than hatchlings acclimated to a warm temperature (28°C). This increase in dive duration at 17°C was not a result of physiological alterations in metabolic rate but was due instead to an increase in aquatic oxygen consumption. Increasing aquatic oxygen consumption permitted cold‐acclimated hatchlings to remain submerged for significantly longer periods, with one turtle undertaking a dive of over 2.5 d. When burst‐swimming speed was used as the measure of performance, thermal acclimation was not detected. Overall, E. macrurus demonstrated a partial ability to acclimate to changes in environmental temperature.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 03 Mar 2009, 03:16:34 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences