The relationship between leisure-time physical activity and the metabolic syndrome: An examination of NHANES III, 1988-1994

DuBose, Katrina D., Addy, Cheryl L., Ainsworth, Barbara E., Hand, Gregory A. and Durstine, J. Larry (2005) The relationship between leisure-time physical activity and the metabolic syndrome: An examination of NHANES III, 1988-1994. Journal of physical activity & health, 2 4: 470-487.


Author DuBose, Katrina D.
Addy, Cheryl L.
Ainsworth, Barbara E.
Hand, Gregory A.
Durstine, J. Larry
Title The relationship between leisure-time physical activity and the metabolic syndrome: An examination of NHANES III, 1988-1994
Journal name Journal of physical activity & health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2005-10-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 470
End page 487
Total pages 18
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Language eng
Subject 111712 Health Promotion
111706 Epidemiology
Formatted abstract
Background:
This study was performed to determine the relationship between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and the metabolic syndrome (MS) in 16,681 adults (43 ± 0.44 y) enrolled in NHANES III.

Methods:
LTPA was classified as regularly active (greater than or equal to 5 d/wk moderate and/or greater than or equal to 3 d/wk vigorous), irregularly active (some LTPA), or inactive (no LTPA). The MS was positive with three or more conditions: 1) abdominal obesity, 2) low HDL-C, 3) hypertriglyceridemia, 4) elevated blood pressure, or 5) elevated glucose. Logistic regression examined the relationship between LTPA and the MS, adjusting for age, race, smoking status, and educational attainment stratified by gender.

Results:
In men only, irregular activity and inactivity was related to an increase in the MS (irregular: OR = 1.52 95% CI 1.11, 1.23; inactive: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.18, 1.98; test for trend P = 0.004). Inactivity increased the odds for abdominal obesity (P < 0.05).

Conclusions:
LTPA levels might influence the development of MS and abdominal obesity.
Keyword Syndrome X
Exercise
Population study
CVD risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 02 Mar 2009, 19:55:42 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences