Attenuation of the stress induced upregulation of sympathetic neurotransmission by plant derived odours

Choy, P. T. and Lavidis, N. A. (2007). Attenuation of the stress induced upregulation of sympathetic neurotransmission by plant derived odours. In: Proceedings of the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2007. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2007, San Diego, (). 3-7 November, 2007.


Author Choy, P. T.
Lavidis, N. A.
Title of paper Attenuation of the stress induced upregulation of sympathetic neurotransmission by plant derived odours
Conference name Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2007
Conference location San Diego
Conference dates 3-7 November, 2007
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting 2007
Place of Publication Online
Publisher Society for Neuroscience
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Complementary and alternative medicine are increasingly used by many to relief the effects of chronic stress. Odours derived from plants, like lavender are currently used to reduce stress. The main problem with traditional and new treatments is that they have not been properly tested with appropriate controls, existing evidence are predominately anecdotal. The main aim of this study was to properly evaluate the effectiveness of traditional and new plant derived odours in reducing the effects of chronic stress with appropriate controls. We used concurrent stressors of social isolation and predator odour as a model for chronically stressing mice over 10 days (D'Arbe et. al., 2002). Animals were divided into 4 groups (n=4 for each group): Group 1 controls (minimal/no stress) with odours, without odours group 2; stress with odours group 3 and stress without odours (group 4). We applied odours to only groups 1 and 3, three times a day by spraying 0.2 ml of odour onto bedding of the animal's cage. Following end of treatment, animals were sacrificed by cervical fracture, blood was collected from the heart and both vasa deferentia dissected free and place in an organ bath. We measured mean amplitudes of extra junctional currents (EJCs) using focal extracellular recording technique. At least 16 randomly chosen recording sites were electrophysiologically studied from each preparation. As demonstrated previously, stressed animals showed higher levels of sympathetic neurotransmission. We tested 7 different odours derived from green plants and graded their activity. We compared their activity with the commonly used stress relief agent, lavender and made an unexpected observation. The most effective plant derived odour, which reduced the physiological effects of chronic stress, was cis-3-hexen-1-ol [0.3%] followed by trans-2-hexenal [0.3%] and then by alpha-pinene [0.3%], the remaining odours had little or no effect. Lavender [0.3%] also had no effect. Our results and other published data suggest that lavender's stress relieving properties may be explained by its vasorelaxing effect (a cooling effect). We have identified 3 plant derived odours that significantly attenuate the stress induced upregulation of neurotransmission from sympathetic varicosities. Our study also demonstrates the highly plastic nature of neurotransmission efficacy.
Subjects 110902 Cellular Nervous System
Q-Index Code EX

 
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