Combined effect of fertilizer and herbicide applications on the abundance, community structure and performance of the soil methanotrophic community

Seghers, D., Siciliano, S., Top, E. and Verstraete, W. (2005) Combined effect of fertilizer and herbicide applications on the abundance, community structure and performance of the soil methanotrophic community. Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 37 2: 187-193. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2004.05.025


Author Seghers, D.
Siciliano, S.
Top, E.
Verstraete, W.
Title Combined effect of fertilizer and herbicide applications on the abundance, community structure and performance of the soil methanotrophic community
Journal name Soil Biology & Biochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0038-0717
Publication date 2005-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2004.05.025
Open Access Status
Volume 37
Issue 2
Start page 187
End page 193
Total pages 7
Editor Burns, R. G.
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 050303 Soil Biology
Abstract The use of agrochemicals, such as mineral fertilizers and herbicides in agricultural systems, may affect the potential of soils to act as a sink for methane. Typically, the effect of each agrochemical on soil methane oxidation is investigated separately whereas in the field these agrochemicals are used together to form one comprehensive land management system. Here we report the results of field experiments that assessed the combined effect of multiple fertilizer and herbicide (nicosulfuron, dimethenamide and atrazine) applications on the soil methanotrophic community. Soils treated with organic fertilizer had three times higher methane oxidation rates compared to soils receiving mineral fertilizers. These higher oxidation rates were positively reflected in a significantly enhanced abundance of methanotrophs for the organic fertilized soils. In contrast, herbicide application did not alter significantly the soil methane oxidation rate or the methane-oxidizing population abundance. Subsequently, the methanotrophic community structure was analyzed with group-specific DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. Cluster analysis of the methanotrophic patterns clearly separated the mineral from organically fertilized soils. Less pronounced clustering differentiated between chemical and manual weed control. Furthermore, cluster analysis of the methanotrophic community revealed that soil type was the primary determinant of the community structure. Our results indicate that fertilizer type had the greatest influence on methane oxidizer activity and abundance. Soil type had the most pronounced effect on the microbial community structure.
Keyword Real-time PCR
DGGE
Methanotroph
Methane oxidation
Agrochemical
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology Publications
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
 
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