The Evolution of Reproductive Charater Displacement Conflicts with how Sexual Selection Operates within a Species

Higgie, M. and Blows, M. W. (2008) The Evolution of Reproductive Charater Displacement Conflicts with how Sexual Selection Operates within a Species. Evolution, 62 5: 1192-1203. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00357.x


Author Higgie, M.
Blows, M. W.
Title The Evolution of Reproductive Charater Displacement Conflicts with how Sexual Selection Operates within a Species
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
Publication date 2008-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00357.x
Volume 62
Issue 5
Start page 1192
End page 1203
Total pages 12
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl. Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)
060303 Biological Adaptation
Abstract Processes that affect the evolution of female preferences or male display traits involved in mating decisions in different geographic areas have the potential to result in within-species divergence. This could occur via reinforcement of mate recognition in species using the same traits for species recognition and sexual selection. Sympatric individuals experience reinforcement of female preferences and male display traits, whereas allopatric individuals do not, creating the potential for divergent sexual selection in sympatric and allopatric populations. Sexual selection operates on the cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of Drosophila serrata, and reinforcement on the CHCs of populations sympatric with D. birchii. Here, we manipulate sexual selection in D. serrata populations generated by hybridizing natural sympatric and allopatric populations. Under the influence of sexual selection, male CHCs evolved from an intermediate phenotype to resemble an allopatric phenotype, which was driven by female choice. Additionally, female choice resulted in evolution of an allopatric female preference, so that allopatric males were preferred to sympatric males. Allopatric CHCs and preferences represent a sexual selection optimum via female choice. Sympatric populations display suboptimal phenotypes relative to their allopatric conspecifics. The combination of reinforcement and sexual selection can therefore generate divergence in female preferences and male display traits.
Formatted abstract
Processes that affect the evolution of female preferences or male display traits involved in mating decisions in different geographic areas have the potential to result in within-species divergence. This could occur via reinforcement of mate recognition in species using the same traits for species recognition and sexual selection. Sympatric individuals experience reinforcement of female preferences and male display traits, whereas allopatric individuals do not, creating the potential for divergent sexual selection in sympatric and allopatric populations. Sexual selection operates on the cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of Drosophila serrata, and reinforcement on the CHCs of populations sympatric with D. birchii. Here, we manipulate sexual selection in D. serrata populations generated by hybridizing natural sympatric and allopatric populations. Under the influence of sexual selection, male CHCs evolved from an intermediate phenotype to resemble an allopatric phenotype, which was driven by female choice. Additionally, female choice resulted in evolution of an allopatric female preference, so that allopatric males were preferred to sympatric males. Allopatric CHCs and preferences represent a sexual selection optimum via female choice. Sympatric populations display suboptimal phenotypes relative to their allopatric conspecifics. The combination of reinforcement and sexual selection can therefore generate divergence in female preferences and male display traits.
Keyword Drosophila serrata
female preference
mate choice
reinforcement
selection experiment
sympatry and allopatry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 54 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 10 Feb 2009, 20:43:44 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences