Significance of a new field oviposition record for Graphium eurypylus (L.) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae)

Larsen, M.L., Scriber, J. M. and Zalucki, M.P. (2008) Significance of a new field oviposition record for Graphium eurypylus (L.) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae). Australian Journal of Entomology, 47 1: 58-63. doi:10.1111/j.1440-6055.2007.00627.x


Author Larsen, M.L.
Scriber, J. M.
Zalucki, M.P.
Title Significance of a new field oviposition record for Graphium eurypylus (L.) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae)
Formatted title
Significance of a new field oviposition record for Graphium eurypylus (L.) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae)
Journal name Australian Journal of Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-6756
Publication date 2008-02-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2007.00627.x
Open Access Status
Volume 47
Issue 1
Start page 58
End page 63
Total pages 6
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject C1
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Abstract Phytochemical similarities among ancient Angiosperms presumably played a role in the ecological and evolutionary diversification of the swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae). Host family feeding specialisation is typical of most Papilionidae species, but field records of oviposition are rare for most swallowtail butterflies. It is even more uncommon to witness oviposition and larval feeding on new host plant species, especially in plant families not previously reported for the butterfly species. Oviposition by a female on a new host, or even on a toxic plant, may represent ancestral behaviour (with a loss of larval acceptance, detoxification or processing abilities) or novel behaviour (providing genetic variation for a potential expansion of host range, or host shift). We document the oviposition, larval use and pupation of the Annonaceae specialised and geographically widespread Graphium eurypylus on a Magnoliaceae species, all under field conditions in Queensland, Australia. This is the first time such field observations of oviposition and larval feeding on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae) have been documented anywhere for this species.
Formatted abstract
Phytochemical similarities among ancient Angiosperms presumably played a role in the ecological and evolutionary diversification of the swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae). Host family feeding specialisation is typical of most Papilionidae species, but field records of oviposition are rare for most swallowtail butterflies. It is even more uncommon to witness oviposition and larval feeding on new host plant species, especially in plant families not previously reported for the butterfly species. Oviposition by a female on a new host, or even on a toxic plant, may represent ancestral behaviour (with a loss of larval acceptance, detoxification or processing abilities) or novel behaviour (providing genetic variation for a potential expansion of host range, or host shift). We document the oviposition, larval use and pupation of the Annonaceae specialised and geographically widespread Graphium eurypylus on a Magnoliaceae species, all under field conditions in Queensland, Australia. This is the first time such field observations of oviposition and larval feeding on Michelia champaca (Magnoliaceae) have been documented anywhere for this species.
Keyword Ancient
Angiosperm
Annonaceae
Host expansion
Papilionidae
Unusual oviposition behaviour
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 07 Feb 2009, 03:19:13 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences