Passive acoustics as a key to the study of marine animals

Cato, Douglas H., Noad, Michael J. and McCauley, Robert D. (2005). Passive acoustics as a key to the study of marine animals. In H. Medwin (Ed.), Sounds in the sea : from ocean acoustics to acoustical oceanography (pp. 411-429) New York: Cambridge University Press.

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Author Cato, Douglas H.
Noad, Michael J.
McCauley, Robert D.
Title of chapter Passive acoustics as a key to the study of marine animals
Title of book Sounds in the sea : from ocean acoustics to acoustical oceanography
Place of Publication New York
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 052182950X
Editor H. Medwin
Chapter number 15
Start page 411
End page 429
Total pages 19
Language eng
Subjects 300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences
0707 Veterinary Sciences
270707 Sociobiology and Behavioural Ecology
770703 Living resources (flora and fauna)
060201 Behavioural Ecology
B1
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The vastness of the oceans makes it difficult to study marine animals because they are so often out of sight, except in a few specialized environments such as the clear shallow waters of tropical reefs.

Because sound travels so much further in the sea than light or other forms of electromagnetic waves, it is natural to turn to acoustics for finding and studying marine animals. Active sonar is used for this purpose but the sounds that the animals produce themselves may also be exploited because so many have high source levels and are detectable at great distances. These vocalizations can be quite spectacular, and are intriguing in terms of the biological function they perform.

This chapter describes some methods use and recent research in the use of fish and marine mammal sounds to study behavior, distributions, and movements, as well as acoustical methods of estimating population sizes and rates of increase in numbers. Even a single hydrophone can provide useful information, while multiple hydrophones can provide detailed information about movements and behavior.
Keyword Underwater acoustics
Seawater Acoustic properties
Oceanography
Q-Index Code B1

 
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Created: Tue, 21 Feb 2006, 02:35:13 EST