Permanence Does Not Predict the Commonly Measured Food Web Structural Attributes.

Kristensen, N.P. (2008) Permanence Does Not Predict the Commonly Measured Food Web Structural Attributes.. American Naturalist, 171 2: 202-213. doi:10.1086/524953

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Author Kristensen, N.P.
Title Permanence Does Not Predict the Commonly Measured Food Web Structural Attributes.
Journal name American Naturalist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-0147
Publication date 2008-02-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1086/524953
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 171
Issue 2
Start page 202
End page 213
Total pages 12
Place of publication Chicago, United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Subject C1
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
060202 Community Ecology(excl. Invasive Species Ecology)
Abstract Food web assembly algorithms show great promise for investigating issues involving the dynamics of whole webs, such as succession, rehabilitation, and invasibility. Permanence, which requires that all species densities remain positive and finite, has been suggested as a good stability constraint. This study tests the validity of the permanence constraint by comparing real webs and model webs from the literature to the predictions of three assembly algorithms: one constrained by permanence and feasibility, one constrained by feasibility alone, and one with no dynamical constraint. It is found that the addition of the permanence constraint does not improve the predictive ability of the algorithm. Its main effect is to increase the efficiency of species selected for the web. Dynamically constrained webs have lower connectance and indistinct trophic levels compared to real webs and webs from other models, which is a consequence of omitting species’ physiology. Although webs are less likely to be permanent if they have high omnivory and cycling, the web‐building process circumvents this constraint. The challenges of testing and justifying system‐level hypotheses, including isolating and detecting their effects, are discussed.
Keyword Food Webs
Stability
Permanence
Feasibility
Niche model
Nested‐hierarchy model
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 23 Jan 2009, 03:18:08 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences