Distribution and phylogenetic relationships of Australian glow-worms Arachnocampa (Diptera, Keroplatidae)

Baker, C. H., Graham, G. C., Scott, K. D., Cameron, S. L., Yeates, D. K. and Merritt, D. J. (2008) Distribution and phylogenetic relationships of Australian glow-worms Arachnocampa (Diptera, Keroplatidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 48 2: 506-514. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2008.04.037


Author Baker, C. H.
Graham, G. C.
Scott, K. D.
Cameron, S. L.
Yeates, D. K.
Merritt, D. J.
Title Distribution and phylogenetic relationships of Australian glow-worms Arachnocampa (Diptera, Keroplatidae)
Formatted title
Distribution and phylogenetic relationships of Australian glow-worms Arachnocampa (Diptera, Keroplatidae)
Journal name Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1055-7903
Publication date 2008-08-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ympev.2008.04.037
Open Access Status
Volume 48
Issue 2
Start page 506
End page 514
Total pages 9
Place of publication United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject C1
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
0604 Genetics
Abstract Glow-worms are bioluminescent fly larvae (Order Diptera, genus Arachnocampa) found only in Australia and New Zealand. Their core habitat is rainforest gullies and wet caves. Eight species are present in Australia; five of them have been recently described. The geographic distribution of species in Australia encompasses the montane regions of the eastern Australian coastline from the Wet Tropics region of northern Queensland to the cool temperate and montane rainforests of southern Australia and Tasmania. Phylogenetic trees based upon partial sequences of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase 11 and 16S mtDNA show that populations tend to be clustered into allopatric geographic groups showing overall concordance with the known species distributions. The deepest division is between the cool-adapted southern subgenus, Lucifera, and the more widespread subgenus, Campara. Lucifera comprises the sister groups, A. tasmaniensis, from Tasmania and the newly described species, A. buffaloensis, found in a high-altitude cave at Mt Buffalo in the Australian Alps in Victoria. The remaining Australian glow-worms in subgenus Campara are distributed in a swathe of geographic clusters that extend from the Wet Tropics in northern Queensland to the temperate forests of southern Victoria. Samples from caves and rainforests within any one geographic location tended to cluster together within a clade. We suggest that the morphological differences between hypogean (cave) and epigean (surface) glow-worm larvae are facultative adaptations to local microclimatic conditions rather than due to the presence of cryptic species in caves. Crown copyright (c) 2008 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Glow-worms are bioluminescent fly larvae (Order Diptera, genus Arachnocampa) found only in Australia and New Zealand. Their core habitat is rainforest gullies and wet caves. Eight species are present in Australia; five of them have been recently described. The geographic distribution of species in Australia encompasses the montane regions of the eastern Australian coastline from the Wet Tropics region of northern Queensland to the cool temperate and montane rainforests of southern Australia and Tasmania. Phylogenetic trees based upon partial sequences of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase II and 16S mtDNA show that populations tend to be clustered into allopatric geographic groups showing overall concordance with the known species distributions. The deepest division is between the cool-adapted southern subgenus, Lucifera, and the more widespread subgenus, Campara. Lucifera comprises the sister groups, A. tasmaniensis, from Tasmania and the newly described species, A. buffaloensis, found in a high-altitude cave at Mt Buffalo in the Australian Alps in Victoria. The remaining Australian glow-worms in subgenus Campara are distributed in a swathe of geographic clusters that extend from the Wet Tropics in northern Queensland to the temperate forests of southern Victoria. Samples from caves and rainforests within any one geographic location tended to cluster together within a clade. We suggest that the morphological differences between hypogean (cave) and epigean (surface) glow-worm larvae are facultative adaptations to local microclimatic conditions rather than due to the presence of cryptic species in caves.
Keyword Phylogeny
Conservation
Wet tropics
Bioluminescence
Cave
Troglophile
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Nov 2008, 22:20:29 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences