An Evolutionary Limit to Male Mating Success

McGuigan, K. L., Van Homrigh, A. J. and Blows, M. W. (2008) An Evolutionary Limit to Male Mating Success. Evolution, 62 6: 1528-1537. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00379.x


Author McGuigan, K. L.
Van Homrigh, A. J.
Blows, M. W.
Title An Evolutionary Limit to Male Mating Success
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
Publication date 2008-06-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00379.x
Volume 62
Issue 6
Start page 1528
End page 1537
Total pages 10
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley- Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060303 Biological Adaptation
060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl. Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)
0603 Evolutionary Biology
Abstract The well-known phenotypic diversity of male sexual displays, and the high levels of genetic variation reported for individual display traits have generated the expectation that male display traits, and consequently male mating success, are highly evolvable. It has not been shown however that selection for male mating success, exerted by female preferences in an unmanipulated population, results in evolutionary change. Here, we tested the expectation that male mating success is highly evolvable in Drosophila bunnanda using an experimental evolution approach. Female D. bunnanda exhibit a strong, consistent preference for a specific combination of male cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs). We used female preference to select for male mating success by propagating replicate populations from either attractive or unattractive males over 10 generations. Neither the combination of CHCs under sexual selection (the sexual signal) nor male mating success itself evolved. The lack of a response to selection was consistent with previous quantitative genetic experiments in D. bunnanda that demonstrated the virtual absence of genetic variance in the combination of CHCs under sexual selection. Persistent directional selection, such as applied by female mate choice, may erode genetic variance, resulting in multitrait evolutionary limits.
Formatted abstract
The well-known phenotypic diversity of male sexual displays, and the high levels of genetic variation reported for individual display traits have generated the expectation that male display traits, and consequently male mating success, are highly evolvable. It has not been shown however that selection for male mating success, exerted by female preferences in an unmanipulated population, results in evolutionary change. Here, we tested the expectation that male mating success is highly evolvable in Drosophila bunnanda using an experimental evolution approach. Female D. bunnanda exhibit a strong, consistent preference for a specific combination of male cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs). We used female preference to select for male mating success by propagating replicate populations from either attractive or unattractive males over 10 generations. Neither the combination of CHCs under sexual selection (the sexual signal) nor male mating success itself evolved. The lack of a response to selection was consistent with previous quantitative genetic experiments in D. bunnanda that demonstrated the virtual absence of genetic variance in the combination of CHCs under sexual selection. Persistent directional selection, such as applied by female mate choice, may erode genetic variance, resulting in multitrait evolutionary limits.
Keyword Artificial selection
Evolutionary potential
Fitness
Sexual Selection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 14 Nov 2008, 22:35:06 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences