The relationship between personal breastfeeding experience and the breastfeeding attitudes, knowledge, confidence and effectiveness of Australian GP registrars

Wendy Brodribb, Anthony Fallon, Claire Jackson and Desley Hegney (2008) The relationship between personal breastfeeding experience and the breastfeeding attitudes, knowledge, confidence and effectiveness of Australian GP registrars. Maternal and Child Nutrition Journal, 4 4: 264-274. doi:10.1111/j.1740-8709.2008.00141.x

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Author Wendy Brodribb
Anthony Fallon
Claire Jackson
Desley Hegney
Title The relationship between personal breastfeeding experience and the breastfeeding attitudes, knowledge, confidence and effectiveness of Australian GP registrars
Journal name Maternal and Child Nutrition Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1740-8695
Publication date 2008-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1740-8709.2008.00141.x
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 4
Issue 4
Start page 264
End page 274
Total pages 11
Editor Peter Aggett
Victoria Hall Moran
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
920507 Women's Health
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified
Abstract In conjunction with other health professionals, doctors believe they play an important role in promoting breastfeeding to women. Although many have positive breastfeeding attitudes, significant knowledge deficits often limit their capacity to effectively encourage, support and assist breastfeeding women and their infants. Personal breastfeeding experience (of self or partner) may be the main source of breastfeeding knowledge and skill development and is related to improved knowledge, more positive attitudes and greater confidence. This paper describes the relationship between the cumulative length of personal breastfeeding experience and the breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of a cohort of Australian general practice (GP) registrars, as well as their confidence and perceived effectiveness assisting breastfeeding women. The Australian Breastfeeding Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire containing demographic items, a 20-item attitude scale and a 40-item knowledge scale was distributed between February and May 2007 to Australian GP registrars in their final year of training. Participants with more than 52-week cumulative personal (self or partner) breastfeeding experience had the highest mean knowledge score, had more positive attitudes, and were more confident and effective than all other participants. Parents with limited personal experience (≤ 26 weeks) had the poorest breast-feeding attitudes and their knowledge base was similar to participants with no personal experience. Confidence and perceived effectiveness when assisting breastfeeding women rose with increasing cumulative breastfeeding experience. Personal breastfeeding experience per se does not guarantee better breastfeeding knowledge or attitudes although increasing length of experience is related to higher knowledge, attitude, confidence and perceived effectiveness scores.
Keyword Australia
breastfeeding attitudes
personal breastfeeding experience
breastfeeding confidence
breastfeeding knowledge
general practitioner
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 30 Sep 2008, 21:24:17 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work