Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s

Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke, Lucke, Jayne, Hockey, Richard and Dobson, Annette (2008) Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s. Social Science and Medicine, 67 1: 122-127. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.03.031

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Author Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke
Lucke, Jayne
Hockey, Richard
Dobson, Annette
Title Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s
Journal name Social Science and Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0277-9536
Publication date 2008-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.03.031
Volume 67
Issue 1
Start page 122
End page 127
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Subject C1
920202 Carer Health
1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to study the order of events leading to informal caregiving and changes in labour force participation in mid-aged women, taking into account health and socioeconomic status. This analysis included 9857 women who responded to the third (2001) and fourth (2004) surveys and provided data for the caring and employment variables used. Caring was defined as providing care for an ill, frail or disabled person at least 7 h/wk. Between 2001 and 2004, the proportion of women caring increased from 12 to 14%. Paid employment participation decreased from 67 to 62% in 2004. Logistic regression model results show that taking up caring between 2001 and 2004 was not statistically significantly associated with employment status in 2001. Among women who took up caring, however, hours spent in paid employment in 2001 was negatively associated with hours spent caring in 2004. Amongst women working in 2001, taking up caring between 2001 and 2004 was associated with reduced participation in paid employment. In conclusion, among mid-aged women, transitions into caregiving were irrespective of time spent in paid employment, but were followed by a decrease in labour force participation. Policies could aim to support continuing labour force participation during caregiving by creating flexible working arrangements; re-employment programs could support women who quit work in getting back to paid employment after a period of caregiving.
Keyword Australia
Informal Care
Work
Labour
Policy
Women
Middle age
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 29 Aug 2008, 04:16:49 EST