Prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

Kessler, Ronald C., Chiu, Wai Tat, Demler, Olga., Merikangas, K. R. and Walters, Ellen E. (2005) Prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62 6: 617-627. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.617

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Author Kessler, Ronald C.
Chiu, Wai Tat
Demler, Olga.
Merikangas, K. R.
Walters, Ellen E.
Title Prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication
Journal name Archives of General Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-990X
2168-6238
Publication date 2005-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.617
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 62
Issue 6
Start page 617
End page 627
Total pages 11
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher American Medical Association
Language eng
Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the general population prevalence or severity of DSM-IV mental disorders. OBJECTIVE: To estimate 12-month prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, impulse control, and substance disorders in the recently completed US National Comorbidity Survey Replication. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationally representative face-to-face household survey conducted between February 2001 and April 2003 using a fully structured diagnostic interview, the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. PARTICIPANTS: Nine thousand two hundred eighty-two English-speaking respondents 18 years and older. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Twelve-month DSM-IV disorders. RESULTS: Twelve-month prevalence estimates were anxiety, 18.1%; mood, 9.5%; impulse control, 8.9%; substance, 3.8%; and any disorder, 26.2%. Of 12-month cases, 22.3% were classified as serious; 37.3%, moderate; and 40.4%, mild. Fifty-five percent carried only a single diagnosis; 22%, 2 diagnoses; and 23%, 3 or more diagnoses. Latent class analysis detected 7 multivariate disorder classes, including 3 highly comorbid classes representing 7% of the population. CONCLUSION: Although mental disorders are widespread, serious cases are concentrated among a relatively small proportion of cases with high comorbidity.
Keyword Household survey
Mental health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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